What School Administrators Think About Computer Science Counting as a Math or Science Graduation Requirement

Eugene Judson, Kristi Glassmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 37 states, an accepted computer science course may qualify or “flex” as a high school graduation requirement in lieu of a traditional requirement, such as mathematics. Applying a first- and second-order barriers framework (i.e., tangible impediments and personal beliefs), we examined views of 60 high school administrators. The administrators were at schools that had not yet adopted flex credit policies and were surveyed regarding readiness of their schools and communities, as well as their personal beliefs, about adopting such a policy. Key findings included learning that the greatest perceived obstacles centered on developing and maintaining computer science courses (e.g., qualified teachers). Administrators were most positive about leadership support and student capacity, although less sure about student interest. Overall, first-order barriers posed greater impediments than second-order barriers. However, one-third of administrators did not favor computer science taking the place of traditional graduation requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-91
Number of pages18
JournalComputers in the Schools
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2020

Keywords

  • beliefs
  • Computer science
  • graduation requirement
  • high school
  • school readiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Education
  • Library and Information Sciences

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