"What Kinds of Social Psychology Experiments Are of Value to Perform?" Comment on Wallach and Wallach (1994)

Mark Schaller, Christian S. Crandall, Charles Stangor, Steven Neuberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

L. Wallach and M.A. Wallach (1994)argued that many hypotheses tested by social psychologists are either "near-tautologies" or derivable from "near-tautologies" and thus are of little interest. The authors of this article applaud their concern but find that their conclusions are based on flawed analyses and arguments. Their conceptualization of "near-tautology" is problematic. Their analysis is based on a misconceived notion of falsifiability and is inattentive to the social context within which scientific knowledge is accumulated. These problems undermine their efforts to offer a careful analysis of social psychological hypotheses. Most alarmingly, their flawed arguments imply a dangerously narrow prescription as to "what kinds of social psychology experiments are of value to perform.".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)611-618
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume69
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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