What Happens When There Is Presumptive 50/50 Parenting Time? An Evaluation of Arizona’s New Child Custody Statute

William Fabricius, Michael Aaron, Faren R. Akins, John J. Assini, Tracy McElroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study presents the findings of an evaluation of Arizona’s 2013 revisions to the child custody statutes that directed courts to “maximize” the child’s parenting time with both parents. A state-wide survey of the four family law professions (i.e., conciliation court staff, judges, mental health providers, and attorneys) assessed their perceptions of the law 4 years after implementation. We averaged the ratings across the four professions to obtain a comprehensive perspective that gave equal weight to each profession. Results revealed that the law functions as a rebuttable presumption of equal parenting time; that it is evaluated positively overall and in terms of children’s best interests; that it is has a neutral impact on legal and interparental conflict; and that it has led to small increases in allegations of domestic violence, child abuse, and substance abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Divorce and Remarriage
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 4 2018

Keywords

  • Divorce
  • equal parenting time
  • parent conflict
  • parenting time
  • public policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Law

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