Abstract

As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: (1) public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; (2) regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; (3) regulatory systems need to be flexible and adaptive to rapidly changing technologies; (4) ethical and social concerns of the public about emerging technologies need to be expressly acknowledged and addressed in regulatory oversight; and (5) international harmonization of regulation may be beneficial in a rapidly globalizing world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)724-731
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Law, Medicine and Ethics
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

History
Technology
Nanotechnology
Administrative Personnel
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

Cite this

What does the history of technology regulation teach us about nano oversight? / Marchant, Gary; Sylvester, Douglas; Abbott, Kenneth.

In: Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 37, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 724-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cedc27af4e5442468006792d78b508a2,
title = "What does the history of technology regulation teach us about nano oversight?",
abstract = "As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: (1) public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; (2) regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; (3) regulatory systems need to be flexible and adaptive to rapidly changing technologies; (4) ethical and social concerns of the public about emerging technologies need to be expressly acknowledged and addressed in regulatory oversight; and (5) international harmonization of regulation may be beneficial in a rapidly globalizing world.",
author = "Gary Marchant and Douglas Sylvester and Kenneth Abbott",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/j.1748-720X.2009.00443.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "724--731",
journal = "Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics",
issn = "1073-1105",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What does the history of technology regulation teach us about nano oversight?

AU - Marchant, Gary

AU - Sylvester, Douglas

AU - Abbott, Kenneth

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: (1) public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; (2) regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; (3) regulatory systems need to be flexible and adaptive to rapidly changing technologies; (4) ethical and social concerns of the public about emerging technologies need to be expressly acknowledged and addressed in regulatory oversight; and (5) international harmonization of regulation may be beneficial in a rapidly globalizing world.

AB - As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: (1) public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; (2) regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; (3) regulatory systems need to be flexible and adaptive to rapidly changing technologies; (4) ethical and social concerns of the public about emerging technologies need to be expressly acknowledged and addressed in regulatory oversight; and (5) international harmonization of regulation may be beneficial in a rapidly globalizing world.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76149100245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76149100245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1748-720X.2009.00443.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1748-720X.2009.00443.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 20122112

AN - SCOPUS:76149100245

VL - 37

SP - 724

EP - 731

JO - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics

JF - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics

SN - 1073-1105

IS - 4

ER -