What do they do? Tracing students' patterns of interactions within a game-Based intelligent tutoring system

Erica L. Snow, G. Tanner Jackson, Danielle McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examine patterns of interactions within the game-based intelligent tutoring system, iSTART-ME. Forty high school students from a mid-south urban environment interacted with iSTART-ME across eight training sessions. Transitional probabilities were calculated based on students' system interaction patterns, focusing on four types of game-based features: generative practice, identification mini-games, personalizable features, and achievement screens. The results revealed how students transitioned from one type of interaction to another and how those interaction patterns varied as a function of the most recent action performed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1481-1482
Number of pages2
JournalProceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS
Volume3
Issue numberJanuary
StatePublished - 2014

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Intelligent systems
interaction pattern
Students
interaction
student
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

What do they do? Tracing students' patterns of interactions within a game-Based intelligent tutoring system. / Snow, Erica L.; Tanner Jackson, G.; McNamara, Danielle.

In: Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS, Vol. 3, No. January, 2014, p. 1481-1482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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