What cognitive benefits does an activity-based reading strategy afford young native american readers?

Scott Marley, Joel Levin, Arthur Glenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors conducted 2 experiments with children from a reservation community. In Experiment 1, 45 third-grade children were randomly assigned to the following reading strategies: (a) "reread," in which participants read each sentence of a story and then reread it; (b) "observe," in which participants read sentences and then observed an experimenter move manipulatives as directed by the story; and (c) "activity," in which participants read sentences and then moved manipulatives as directed by the story. In Experiment 2, 40 second-grade children were randomly assigned to either the reread or activity strategy. In both experiments, activity participants remembered more story content than did reread participants. In Experiment 1, the authors identified no memory differences between observe and activity strategies. When imagery instructions replaced the original strategies, Experiment 1 third-grade activity (and observe) participants recalled more story content than did reread participants, but Experiment 2 second-grade activity participants did not. The authors discuss the instructional benefits of activity-based reading strategies, along with developmental implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-417
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Experimental Education
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Embodiment
  • Imagery
  • Native American
  • Reading
  • Strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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