“We Weren’t Ready”: Provider Perspectives on Addressing Intimate Partner Violence Among Refugees and Immigrants in The United States

Karin Wachter, Laurie Cook Heffron, Jessica Dalpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined organizational factors influencing the availability and accessibility of IPV services for refugee and other vulnerable immigrant women in the U.S. from the perspectives of social service providers. This qualitative study used a purposive sampling approach to recruit 57 social service providers. Researchers analyzed data generated from individual interviews and focus group discussions using a thematic approach. The analysis generated four themes reflective of structural and systemic factors shaping the availability and accessibility of IPV services for immigrant and refugee women in the U.S.: (1) We weren’t ready, (2) No place to go, (3) Time is not on our side, and (4) Can’t do it alone. The analysis illuminated the extent to which service demands outweighed organizational capacities and the rigidity of service timelines that failed to meet needs. A pervasive thread of ethical dilemmas emerged, affecting the availability and accessibility of services. Overall, the findings form a compelling argument for structural shifts in policy and funding, and for fostering strong inter-sectoral coordination to combat barriers to services. The study reiterates the importance of addressing inter-agency collaboration in IPV research, policy, and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Family Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Coalition building
  • Domestic violence
  • Inter-organizational coordination
  • Refugee resettlement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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