We think we can, we think we can, we think we can: The impact of thinking patterns and self-efficacy on work team sustainability

Jeffery D. Houghton, Christopher P. Neck, Charles C. Manz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

In terms of the body of knowledge examining work teams, several books and articles have attempted to address the underlying causes of why work teams fail. However, a scarcity of writings has focused on the issue of work team sustainability. The dictionary defines “sustain” as “to prevent from falling, collapsing, or giving way,” and “to endure.” This definition gives rise to the following question: “What are the factors that contribute to those work teams that ‘endure’ and that do not ‘fall, collapse, or give way’ during challenging organizational experiences?” In this paper, we will take an initial step toward answering this question by presenting a cognitive model of work team sustainability based upon established cognitive principles of individual-level effort and performance sustainability. This model is designed to provide some practical insights into the long-term team performance sustainability issue while also serving as a possible foundation for future research efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalTeam Performance Management: An International Journal
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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