Water relations of tiger beetle larvae (Cicindela marutha): correlations with habitat microclimate and burrowing activity

N. F. Hadley, C. B. Knisley, T. D. Schultz, David Pearson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Third instar larvae of C. marutha occupy burrows in exposed hot, dry sand ridges. They are active at the surface at midday during spring and fall, but plug their burrows during the summer day and become active only at night. Water loss rates increase moderately with increasing temperatures (25-40°C) and show a consistent decline with increasing relative humidity (0-97.5%). The larvae do not absorb sufficient atmospheric moisture at any of the high humidities to offset water lost via transpiration, but they ingest moist sand while burrowed and absorb the water from their digestive tract. This uptake mechanism supplements water obtained from prey, whose availability is limited, and also enables them to remain in positive water balance during times that microclimatic conditions prevent them from feeding on the surface. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-197
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Arid Environments
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Cicindela
Cicindelinae
water relations
burrowing
microclimate
insect larvae
beetle
larva
habitat
habitats
burrow
burrows
water
sand
sand ridge
atmospheric moisture
prey availability
larvae
digestive tract
water balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Water relations of tiger beetle larvae (Cicindela marutha) : correlations with habitat microclimate and burrowing activity. / Hadley, N. F.; Knisley, C. B.; Schultz, T. D.; Pearson, David.

In: Journal of Arid Environments, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.01.1990, p. 189-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hadley, N. F. ; Knisley, C. B. ; Schultz, T. D. ; Pearson, David. / Water relations of tiger beetle larvae (Cicindela marutha) : correlations with habitat microclimate and burrowing activity. In: Journal of Arid Environments. 1990 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 189-197.
@article{4ac6ad370e514b9fb598decdf0b46c0b,
title = "Water relations of tiger beetle larvae (Cicindela marutha): correlations with habitat microclimate and burrowing activity",
abstract = "Third instar larvae of C. marutha occupy burrows in exposed hot, dry sand ridges. They are active at the surface at midday during spring and fall, but plug their burrows during the summer day and become active only at night. Water loss rates increase moderately with increasing temperatures (25-40°C) and show a consistent decline with increasing relative humidity (0-97.5{\%}). The larvae do not absorb sufficient atmospheric moisture at any of the high humidities to offset water lost via transpiration, but they ingest moist sand while burrowed and absorb the water from their digestive tract. This uptake mechanism supplements water obtained from prey, whose availability is limited, and also enables them to remain in positive water balance during times that microclimatic conditions prevent them from feeding on the surface. -from Authors",
author = "Hadley, {N. F.} and Knisley, {C. B.} and Schultz, {T. D.} and David Pearson",
year = "1990",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "189--197",
journal = "Journal of Arid Environments",
issn = "0140-1963",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Water relations of tiger beetle larvae (Cicindela marutha)

T2 - correlations with habitat microclimate and burrowing activity

AU - Hadley, N. F.

AU - Knisley, C. B.

AU - Schultz, T. D.

AU - Pearson, David

PY - 1990/1/1

Y1 - 1990/1/1

N2 - Third instar larvae of C. marutha occupy burrows in exposed hot, dry sand ridges. They are active at the surface at midday during spring and fall, but plug their burrows during the summer day and become active only at night. Water loss rates increase moderately with increasing temperatures (25-40°C) and show a consistent decline with increasing relative humidity (0-97.5%). The larvae do not absorb sufficient atmospheric moisture at any of the high humidities to offset water lost via transpiration, but they ingest moist sand while burrowed and absorb the water from their digestive tract. This uptake mechanism supplements water obtained from prey, whose availability is limited, and also enables them to remain in positive water balance during times that microclimatic conditions prevent them from feeding on the surface. -from Authors

AB - Third instar larvae of C. marutha occupy burrows in exposed hot, dry sand ridges. They are active at the surface at midday during spring and fall, but plug their burrows during the summer day and become active only at night. Water loss rates increase moderately with increasing temperatures (25-40°C) and show a consistent decline with increasing relative humidity (0-97.5%). The larvae do not absorb sufficient atmospheric moisture at any of the high humidities to offset water lost via transpiration, but they ingest moist sand while burrowed and absorb the water from their digestive tract. This uptake mechanism supplements water obtained from prey, whose availability is limited, and also enables them to remain in positive water balance during times that microclimatic conditions prevent them from feeding on the surface. -from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025660856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025660856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0025660856

VL - 19

SP - 189

EP - 197

JO - Journal of Arid Environments

JF - Journal of Arid Environments

SN - 0140-1963

IS - 2

ER -