Watching a fun artistic video about Simpson's paradox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explores how university students respond to a brief artistic and humorous educational video covering a statistics topic. Major study activities included a background knowledge questionnaire, watching the video, completing a storyboard by identifying images from three scenes in the video, explaining the topic using the recalled images, and, finally, answering questions about the topic that were presented in a different context. The images shown to participants differed according to conceptual and detail accuracy. The results suggest that the details of the animation were more salient in participants' memory than the concepts. This study introduces a novel way of probing recognition of instructional content via visual memory rather than through written statements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-88
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

video
statistics
questionnaire
university
student

Keywords

  • Artistic instructional content
  • Humorous instructional videos
  • Statistics learning
  • Visual recall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Watching a fun artistic video about Simpson's paradox. / van de Sande, Carla.

In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, Vol. 17, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 77-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1a88a5918a8f4b2fa1a82133b8737cd8,
title = "Watching a fun artistic video about Simpson's paradox",
abstract = "This study explores how university students respond to a brief artistic and humorous educational video covering a statistics topic. Major study activities included a background knowledge questionnaire, watching the video, completing a storyboard by identifying images from three scenes in the video, explaining the topic using the recalled images, and, finally, answering questions about the topic that were presented in a different context. The images shown to participants differed according to conceptual and detail accuracy. The results suggest that the details of the animation were more salient in participants' memory than the concepts. This study introduces a novel way of probing recognition of instructional content via visual memory rather than through written statements.",
keywords = "Artistic instructional content, Humorous instructional videos, Statistics learning, Visual recall",
author = "{van de Sande}, Carla",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.26803/ijlter.17.11.6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "77--88",
journal = "International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research",
issn = "1694-2493",
publisher = "Society for Research and Knowledge Management",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Watching a fun artistic video about Simpson's paradox

AU - van de Sande, Carla

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - This study explores how university students respond to a brief artistic and humorous educational video covering a statistics topic. Major study activities included a background knowledge questionnaire, watching the video, completing a storyboard by identifying images from three scenes in the video, explaining the topic using the recalled images, and, finally, answering questions about the topic that were presented in a different context. The images shown to participants differed according to conceptual and detail accuracy. The results suggest that the details of the animation were more salient in participants' memory than the concepts. This study introduces a novel way of probing recognition of instructional content via visual memory rather than through written statements.

AB - This study explores how university students respond to a brief artistic and humorous educational video covering a statistics topic. Major study activities included a background knowledge questionnaire, watching the video, completing a storyboard by identifying images from three scenes in the video, explaining the topic using the recalled images, and, finally, answering questions about the topic that were presented in a different context. The images shown to participants differed according to conceptual and detail accuracy. The results suggest that the details of the animation were more salient in participants' memory than the concepts. This study introduces a novel way of probing recognition of instructional content via visual memory rather than through written statements.

KW - Artistic instructional content

KW - Humorous instructional videos

KW - Statistics learning

KW - Visual recall

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061248395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061248395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.26803/ijlter.17.11.6

DO - 10.26803/ijlter.17.11.6

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85061248395

VL - 17

SP - 77

EP - 88

JO - International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research

JF - International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research

SN - 1694-2493

IS - 11

ER -