Walking Workstation Use Reduces Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adults With Prehypertension

Zachary S. Zeigler, Pamela Swan, Dharini M. Bhammar, Glenn Gaesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The acute effect of low-intensity walking on blood pressure (BP) is unclear.

PURPOSE: To determine if the acute use of a walking workstation reduces ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in prehypertensive men and women.

METHODS: Ten prehypertensive adults participated in a randomized, cross-over study that included a control workday and a walking workstation workday. ABP was measured for 7 hour during the workday and for 6 hour after work.

RESULTS: Both systolic BP (SBP) (134 ± 14 vs. 137 ± 16 mmHg; P = .027) and diastolic BP (DBP) (79 ± 10 vs. 82 ± 12 mmHg; P = .001) were lower on the walking workstation day. Postwork hours (4:00 PM-10:00 PM), SBP (129 ± 13 vs. 133 ± 14 mmHg; P = .008), and DBP (74 ± 11 vs. 78 ± 13 mmHg; P = .001) were also lower on the walking workstation day. DBP load was significantly lower during the walking workstation day, with only 14% of the readings above 90 mmHg compared with 22% of the control day readings (P = .037).

CONCLUSION: Accumulation of very-light-intensity physical activity (~2 METs) over the course of a single work day using a walking workstation may reduce BP burden in prehypertensive individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S119-S127
JournalJournal of physical activity & health
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Walking Workstation Use Reduces Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Adults With Prehypertension'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this