Vulnerability and Resilience in Women With Arthritis: Test of a Two-Factor Model

Bruce W. Smith, Alex J. Zautra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test a 2-factor model of affective health in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n = 88). Positive and negative social interactions and affect were assessed for 11 consecutive weeks. For each participant, Vulnerability and Resilience factors were created from factor analyses of positive and negative personal characteristics, respectively. Multilevel analyses tested the hypothesis that weekly changes in social interactions or affect would only be predicted by the factor of the same valence. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in negative interactions. The Resilience (and not the Vulnerability) factor predicted changes in positive interactions. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in current and next-week negative affect. The Resilience and Vulnerability factors each predicted changes in current and next-week positive affect, although the effects for Vulnerability were smaller than for Resilience. Finally, the Vulnerability factor interacted with pain to predict more future negative affect. The main implication is that both Vulnerability and Resilience should be considered in theory, research, and interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)799-810
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Fingerprint

Arthritis
Interpersonal Relations
Multilevel Analysis
Women's Health
Osteoarthritis
Statistical Factor Analysis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Pain
Research

Keywords

  • affect
  • arthritis
  • resilience
  • vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Vulnerability and Resilience in Women With Arthritis : Test of a Two-Factor Model. / Smith, Bruce W.; Zautra, Alex J.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 76, No. 5, 10.2008, p. 799-810.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d52787ebbaef450d985d836d71686c5a,
title = "Vulnerability and Resilience in Women With Arthritis: Test of a Two-Factor Model",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to test a 2-factor model of affective health in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n = 88). Positive and negative social interactions and affect were assessed for 11 consecutive weeks. For each participant, Vulnerability and Resilience factors were created from factor analyses of positive and negative personal characteristics, respectively. Multilevel analyses tested the hypothesis that weekly changes in social interactions or affect would only be predicted by the factor of the same valence. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in negative interactions. The Resilience (and not the Vulnerability) factor predicted changes in positive interactions. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in current and next-week negative affect. The Resilience and Vulnerability factors each predicted changes in current and next-week positive affect, although the effects for Vulnerability were smaller than for Resilience. Finally, the Vulnerability factor interacted with pain to predict more future negative affect. The main implication is that both Vulnerability and Resilience should be considered in theory, research, and interventions.",
keywords = "affect, arthritis, resilience, vulnerability",
author = "Smith, {Bruce W.} and Zautra, {Alex J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1037/0022-006X.76.5.799",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "799--810",
journal = "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology",
issn = "0022-006X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vulnerability and Resilience in Women With Arthritis

T2 - Test of a Two-Factor Model

AU - Smith, Bruce W.

AU - Zautra, Alex J.

PY - 2008/10

Y1 - 2008/10

N2 - The purpose of this study was to test a 2-factor model of affective health in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n = 88). Positive and negative social interactions and affect were assessed for 11 consecutive weeks. For each participant, Vulnerability and Resilience factors were created from factor analyses of positive and negative personal characteristics, respectively. Multilevel analyses tested the hypothesis that weekly changes in social interactions or affect would only be predicted by the factor of the same valence. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in negative interactions. The Resilience (and not the Vulnerability) factor predicted changes in positive interactions. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in current and next-week negative affect. The Resilience and Vulnerability factors each predicted changes in current and next-week positive affect, although the effects for Vulnerability were smaller than for Resilience. Finally, the Vulnerability factor interacted with pain to predict more future negative affect. The main implication is that both Vulnerability and Resilience should be considered in theory, research, and interventions.

AB - The purpose of this study was to test a 2-factor model of affective health in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 82) or osteoarthritis (OA; n = 88). Positive and negative social interactions and affect were assessed for 11 consecutive weeks. For each participant, Vulnerability and Resilience factors were created from factor analyses of positive and negative personal characteristics, respectively. Multilevel analyses tested the hypothesis that weekly changes in social interactions or affect would only be predicted by the factor of the same valence. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in negative interactions. The Resilience (and not the Vulnerability) factor predicted changes in positive interactions. The Vulnerability (and not the Resilience) factor predicted changes in current and next-week negative affect. The Resilience and Vulnerability factors each predicted changes in current and next-week positive affect, although the effects for Vulnerability were smaller than for Resilience. Finally, the Vulnerability factor interacted with pain to predict more future negative affect. The main implication is that both Vulnerability and Resilience should be considered in theory, research, and interventions.

KW - affect

KW - arthritis

KW - resilience

KW - vulnerability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54849406982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54849406982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0022-006X.76.5.799

DO - 10.1037/0022-006X.76.5.799

M3 - Article

C2 - 18837597

AN - SCOPUS:54849406982

VL - 76

SP - 799

EP - 810

JO - Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

JF - Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

SN - 0022-006X

IS - 5

ER -