Voices from the Field: Perspectives of U.S. Kinesiology Chairs on Opportunities, Challenges, and the Role of Mentoring in the Chair Position

Lynda B. Ransdell, Nhu Nguyen, Mary A. Hums, Megan Clark, Sarah B. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined perspectives of U.S. collegiate kinesiology department chairs (n = 54/144; 37.5% response rate) relative to: (a) opportunities and most enjoyable aspects of being a department chair, (b) challenges and least enjoyable aspects of being a department chair, and (c) perspectives on mentoring. The majority of participants enjoyed their chair role (90%) and did not aspire to advance in administration (61%). Job-related opportunities included mentoring others, facilitating department success, and leading initiatives (e.g., curricula, policies, and finances). Job-related challenges included a lack of university support, personnel issues, and urgent requests for information. Many had a mentor for a long time (mean = 7.9 ± 7.6 years; range 1 to 28 years), and the majority (71%) did not consider their dean a mentor. Protégés appreciated their mentors’ experience, listening skills, and willingness to share information, advice, and empathy. Results from this study provide helpful information for serving as a kinesiology chair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalQuest
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 13 2017

Keywords

  • Academic administration
  • academics
  • diversity
  • higher education
  • leadership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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