Vitamin C status of an outpatient population

Carol Johnston, Lori L. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determined the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency (plasma vitamin C concentrations less than 11.4 μmol/L) and vitamin C depletion (plasma vitamin C concentrations from 11.4 to less than 28.4 μmol/L) in an outpatient population. Subjects and Methods: A consecutive sample of patients presenting at a health maintenance organization laboratory for outpatient procedures was utilized. Plasma vitamin C concentrations were determined in 350 females and 144 males, aged 6 to 92 years (mean ± SD: 46.7 ± 18.7 years). Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration for all subjects was 32.4 ± 13.6 μmol/L. Mean plasma vitamin C did not vary by sex, race, or fasted state. Diabetics had a significantly lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration (25.6 ± 10.8 μmol/L) compared to patients presenting for general check-up/gynecological exams (33.5 ± 14.8 μmol/L) or pregnancy exams (32.4 ± 9.7 μmol/L). Six percent of subjects had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicative of vitamin C deficiency (n=31), and 30.4% of the sample were vitamin C depleted (n = 150). The prevalence of vitamin C deficiency or vitamin C depletion did not differ by race or visit category. Conclusions: Surprisingly high rates of vitamin C deficiency and vitamin C depletion were evident among generally healthy, middle class patients visiting a health care facility for routine health exams, gynecological exams, and pregnancy exams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-370
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1998

Fingerprint

Ascorbic Acid
Outpatients
ascorbic acid
Ascorbic Acid Deficiency
ascorbic acid deficiency
Population
Gynecological Examination
pregnancy
Pregnancy
Health Maintenance Organizations
Health Facilities
health services
Delivery of Health Care
sampling
gender
Health

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • Deficiency
  • Depletion
  • Status
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Vitamin C status of an outpatient population. / Johnston, Carol; Thompson, Lori L.

In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 4, 08.1998, p. 366-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d61030674ed44a4694b2ce7abbd9d61a,
title = "Vitamin C status of an outpatient population",
abstract = "Objective: To determined the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency (plasma vitamin C concentrations less than 11.4 μmol/L) and vitamin C depletion (plasma vitamin C concentrations from 11.4 to less than 28.4 μmol/L) in an outpatient population. Subjects and Methods: A consecutive sample of patients presenting at a health maintenance organization laboratory for outpatient procedures was utilized. Plasma vitamin C concentrations were determined in 350 females and 144 males, aged 6 to 92 years (mean ± SD: 46.7 ± 18.7 years). Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration for all subjects was 32.4 ± 13.6 μmol/L. Mean plasma vitamin C did not vary by sex, race, or fasted state. Diabetics had a significantly lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration (25.6 ± 10.8 μmol/L) compared to patients presenting for general check-up/gynecological exams (33.5 ± 14.8 μmol/L) or pregnancy exams (32.4 ± 9.7 μmol/L). Six percent of subjects had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicative of vitamin C deficiency (n=31), and 30.4{\%} of the sample were vitamin C depleted (n = 150). The prevalence of vitamin C deficiency or vitamin C depletion did not differ by race or visit category. Conclusions: Surprisingly high rates of vitamin C deficiency and vitamin C depletion were evident among generally healthy, middle class patients visiting a health care facility for routine health exams, gynecological exams, and pregnancy exams.",
keywords = "Ascorbic acid, Deficiency, Depletion, Status, Vitamin C",
author = "Carol Johnston and Thompson, {Lori L.}",
year = "1998",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "366--370",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Nutrition",
issn = "0731-5724",
publisher = "American College Of Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin C status of an outpatient population

AU - Johnston, Carol

AU - Thompson, Lori L.

PY - 1998/8

Y1 - 1998/8

N2 - Objective: To determined the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency (plasma vitamin C concentrations less than 11.4 μmol/L) and vitamin C depletion (plasma vitamin C concentrations from 11.4 to less than 28.4 μmol/L) in an outpatient population. Subjects and Methods: A consecutive sample of patients presenting at a health maintenance organization laboratory for outpatient procedures was utilized. Plasma vitamin C concentrations were determined in 350 females and 144 males, aged 6 to 92 years (mean ± SD: 46.7 ± 18.7 years). Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration for all subjects was 32.4 ± 13.6 μmol/L. Mean plasma vitamin C did not vary by sex, race, or fasted state. Diabetics had a significantly lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration (25.6 ± 10.8 μmol/L) compared to patients presenting for general check-up/gynecological exams (33.5 ± 14.8 μmol/L) or pregnancy exams (32.4 ± 9.7 μmol/L). Six percent of subjects had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicative of vitamin C deficiency (n=31), and 30.4% of the sample were vitamin C depleted (n = 150). The prevalence of vitamin C deficiency or vitamin C depletion did not differ by race or visit category. Conclusions: Surprisingly high rates of vitamin C deficiency and vitamin C depletion were evident among generally healthy, middle class patients visiting a health care facility for routine health exams, gynecological exams, and pregnancy exams.

AB - Objective: To determined the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency (plasma vitamin C concentrations less than 11.4 μmol/L) and vitamin C depletion (plasma vitamin C concentrations from 11.4 to less than 28.4 μmol/L) in an outpatient population. Subjects and Methods: A consecutive sample of patients presenting at a health maintenance organization laboratory for outpatient procedures was utilized. Plasma vitamin C concentrations were determined in 350 females and 144 males, aged 6 to 92 years (mean ± SD: 46.7 ± 18.7 years). Results: The mean plasma vitamin C concentration for all subjects was 32.4 ± 13.6 μmol/L. Mean plasma vitamin C did not vary by sex, race, or fasted state. Diabetics had a significantly lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration (25.6 ± 10.8 μmol/L) compared to patients presenting for general check-up/gynecological exams (33.5 ± 14.8 μmol/L) or pregnancy exams (32.4 ± 9.7 μmol/L). Six percent of subjects had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicative of vitamin C deficiency (n=31), and 30.4% of the sample were vitamin C depleted (n = 150). The prevalence of vitamin C deficiency or vitamin C depletion did not differ by race or visit category. Conclusions: Surprisingly high rates of vitamin C deficiency and vitamin C depletion were evident among generally healthy, middle class patients visiting a health care facility for routine health exams, gynecological exams, and pregnancy exams.

KW - Ascorbic acid

KW - Deficiency

KW - Depletion

KW - Status

KW - Vitamin C

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031928289&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031928289&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9710847

AN - SCOPUS:0031928289

VL - 17

SP - 366

EP - 370

JO - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition

SN - 0731-5724

IS - 4

ER -