Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders.

T. L. Bazzarre, S. M. Kleiner, Barbara Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research compared nutrient intake data with blood lipids and anthropometric data. Height, weight, and seven skinfolds were collected 3 days prior to competition at the official weigh-in. The lipids measured were total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol subfractions. The subjects were 17 males and 17 females. Descriptive data are presented as means and standard deviations of the means. Protein, fat, and carbohydrate provided about 40, 12, and 48%, respectively, of total energy intake; vitamin C was > 200 mg/day. Only dietary fat was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with TC for females. Fiber was significantly associated with HDL-C and HDL2-C for males and with HDL-C for females. Vitamin C was significantly associated with HDL-C,HDL2-C, and HDL3-C for males, and with HDL-C and HDL3-C for females. These findings are consistent with those reported by Bazzarre et al. in farmers and suggest that vitamin C may favorably influence HDL-C metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-271
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

high density lipoprotein cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Ascorbic Acid
ascorbic acid
Lipids
lipids
cholesterol
cholesterol metabolism
Cholesterol
nutrient intake
dietary fat
blood lipids
Dietary Fats
energy intake
dietary fiber
Energy Intake
farmers
carbohydrates
Fats
Carbohydrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders. / Bazzarre, T. L.; Kleiner, S. M.; Ainsworth, Barbara.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition, Vol. 2, No. 3, 09.1992, p. 260-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bazzarre, TL, Kleiner, SM & Ainsworth, B 1992, 'Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders.', International Journal of Sport Nutrition, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 260-271.
Bazzarre, T. L. ; Kleiner, S. M. ; Ainsworth, Barbara. / Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition. 1992 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 260-271.
@article{0ae88e8ac92b4e8bbb3315f3cf2a6dd4,
title = "Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders.",
abstract = "This research compared nutrient intake data with blood lipids and anthropometric data. Height, weight, and seven skinfolds were collected 3 days prior to competition at the official weigh-in. The lipids measured were total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol subfractions. The subjects were 17 males and 17 females. Descriptive data are presented as means and standard deviations of the means. Protein, fat, and carbohydrate provided about 40, 12, and 48{\%}, respectively, of total energy intake; vitamin C was > 200 mg/day. Only dietary fat was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with TC for females. Fiber was significantly associated with HDL-C and HDL2-C for males and with HDL-C for females. Vitamin C was significantly associated with HDL-C,HDL2-C, and HDL3-C for males, and with HDL-C and HDL3-C for females. These findings are consistent with those reported by Bazzarre et al. in farmers and suggest that vitamin C may favorably influence HDL-C metabolism.",
author = "Bazzarre, {T. L.} and Kleiner, {S. M.} and Barbara Ainsworth",
year = "1992",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "260--271",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism",
issn = "1526-484X",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin C intake and lipid profiles of competitive male and female bodybuilders.

AU - Bazzarre, T. L.

AU - Kleiner, S. M.

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

PY - 1992/9

Y1 - 1992/9

N2 - This research compared nutrient intake data with blood lipids and anthropometric data. Height, weight, and seven skinfolds were collected 3 days prior to competition at the official weigh-in. The lipids measured were total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol subfractions. The subjects were 17 males and 17 females. Descriptive data are presented as means and standard deviations of the means. Protein, fat, and carbohydrate provided about 40, 12, and 48%, respectively, of total energy intake; vitamin C was > 200 mg/day. Only dietary fat was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with TC for females. Fiber was significantly associated with HDL-C and HDL2-C for males and with HDL-C for females. Vitamin C was significantly associated with HDL-C,HDL2-C, and HDL3-C for males, and with HDL-C and HDL3-C for females. These findings are consistent with those reported by Bazzarre et al. in farmers and suggest that vitamin C may favorably influence HDL-C metabolism.

AB - This research compared nutrient intake data with blood lipids and anthropometric data. Height, weight, and seven skinfolds were collected 3 days prior to competition at the official weigh-in. The lipids measured were total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and the HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol subfractions. The subjects were 17 males and 17 females. Descriptive data are presented as means and standard deviations of the means. Protein, fat, and carbohydrate provided about 40, 12, and 48%, respectively, of total energy intake; vitamin C was > 200 mg/day. Only dietary fat was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with TC for females. Fiber was significantly associated with HDL-C and HDL2-C for males and with HDL-C for females. Vitamin C was significantly associated with HDL-C,HDL2-C, and HDL3-C for males, and with HDL-C and HDL3-C for females. These findings are consistent with those reported by Bazzarre et al. in farmers and suggest that vitamin C may favorably influence HDL-C metabolism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026921315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026921315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1299498

AN - SCOPUS:0026921315

VL - 2

SP - 260

EP - 271

JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

SN - 1526-484X

IS - 3

ER -