Vitamin C elevates red blood cell glutathione in healthy adults

Carol Johnston, Claudia G. Meyer, J. C. Srilakshmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on red blood cell glutathione. Subjects consumed self-selected vitamin C-restricted diets, and, under double-blind conditions, ingested placebo daily for week 1 (baseline). 500 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 2-3, 2000 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 4-5. and placebo daily for week 6 (withdraw). Mean red blood cell glutathione rose nearly 50% (P < 0.05) after the 500-mg period compared with baseline, and the changes from baseline for individual subjects ranged from +8% to +84%. However, the increases in plasma vitamin C and red blood cell glutathione were not correlated (r = 0.22). At the 2000-mg dosage, mean red blood cell glutathione was not significantly different from the value obtained at the 500-mg dosage. After the placebo-controlled withdraw period, red blood cell glutathione did not differ from baseline. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation (500 mg/d) maintains reduced glutathione concentrations in blood and improves the overall antioxidant protection capacity of blood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-105
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Ascorbic Acid
Glutathione
glutathione
erythrocytes
Erythrocytes
ascorbic acid
placebos
Placebos
lissamine rhodamine B
blood
dosage
Rosa
Antioxidants
Diet
antioxidants
diet

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Ascorbic acid
  • Glutathione
  • Red blood cell lytic sensitivity
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Vitamin C elevates red blood cell glutathione in healthy adults. / Johnston, Carol; Meyer, Claudia G.; Srilakshmi, J. C.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 58, No. 1, 1993, p. 103-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnston, Carol ; Meyer, Claudia G. ; Srilakshmi, J. C. / Vitamin C elevates red blood cell glutathione in healthy adults. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 103-105.
@article{697cc763439e421ea4599ef94a3e92b6,
title = "Vitamin C elevates red blood cell glutathione in healthy adults",
abstract = "We examined the effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on red blood cell glutathione. Subjects consumed self-selected vitamin C-restricted diets, and, under double-blind conditions, ingested placebo daily for week 1 (baseline). 500 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 2-3, 2000 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 4-5. and placebo daily for week 6 (withdraw). Mean red blood cell glutathione rose nearly 50{\%} (P < 0.05) after the 500-mg period compared with baseline, and the changes from baseline for individual subjects ranged from +8{\%} to +84{\%}. However, the increases in plasma vitamin C and red blood cell glutathione were not correlated (r = 0.22). At the 2000-mg dosage, mean red blood cell glutathione was not significantly different from the value obtained at the 500-mg dosage. After the placebo-controlled withdraw period, red blood cell glutathione did not differ from baseline. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation (500 mg/d) maintains reduced glutathione concentrations in blood and improves the overall antioxidant protection capacity of blood.",
keywords = "Antioxidants, Ascorbic acid, Glutathione, Red blood cell lytic sensitivity, Vitamin C",
author = "Carol Johnston and Meyer, {Claudia G.} and Srilakshmi, {J. C.}",
year = "1993",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "103--105",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin C elevates red blood cell glutathione in healthy adults

AU - Johnston, Carol

AU - Meyer, Claudia G.

AU - Srilakshmi, J. C.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - We examined the effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on red blood cell glutathione. Subjects consumed self-selected vitamin C-restricted diets, and, under double-blind conditions, ingested placebo daily for week 1 (baseline). 500 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 2-3, 2000 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 4-5. and placebo daily for week 6 (withdraw). Mean red blood cell glutathione rose nearly 50% (P < 0.05) after the 500-mg period compared with baseline, and the changes from baseline for individual subjects ranged from +8% to +84%. However, the increases in plasma vitamin C and red blood cell glutathione were not correlated (r = 0.22). At the 2000-mg dosage, mean red blood cell glutathione was not significantly different from the value obtained at the 500-mg dosage. After the placebo-controlled withdraw period, red blood cell glutathione did not differ from baseline. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation (500 mg/d) maintains reduced glutathione concentrations in blood and improves the overall antioxidant protection capacity of blood.

AB - We examined the effect of supplemental ascorbic acid on red blood cell glutathione. Subjects consumed self-selected vitamin C-restricted diets, and, under double-blind conditions, ingested placebo daily for week 1 (baseline). 500 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 2-3, 2000 mg L-ascorbate/d for weeks 4-5. and placebo daily for week 6 (withdraw). Mean red blood cell glutathione rose nearly 50% (P < 0.05) after the 500-mg period compared with baseline, and the changes from baseline for individual subjects ranged from +8% to +84%. However, the increases in plasma vitamin C and red blood cell glutathione were not correlated (r = 0.22). At the 2000-mg dosage, mean red blood cell glutathione was not significantly different from the value obtained at the 500-mg dosage. After the placebo-controlled withdraw period, red blood cell glutathione did not differ from baseline. These data indicate that vitamin C supplementation (500 mg/d) maintains reduced glutathione concentrations in blood and improves the overall antioxidant protection capacity of blood.

KW - Antioxidants

KW - Ascorbic acid

KW - Glutathione

KW - Red blood cell lytic sensitivity

KW - Vitamin C

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027265254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027265254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8317379

AN - SCOPUS:0027265254

VL - 58

SP - 103

EP - 105

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 1

ER -