Visuospatial thinking in the professional writing classroom

Claire Lauer, Christopher A. Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that teaching professional writing students how to think visually can improve their ability to design visual texts. This article extends this suggestion and explores how the ability to think visuospatially influenced students' success at designing visual texts in a small upper-division class on visual communication. Although all the students received the same instruction, students who demonstrated higher spatial faculties were more successful at developing and designing visual materials than were the other students in the class. This result suggests that the ability to think visuospatially is advantageous for learning how to communicate visually and that teaching students to think visuospatially should be a primary instructional focus to maximize all student learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-218
Number of pages35
JournalJournal of Business and Technical Communication
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Students
classroom
student
Teaching
ability
Visual communication
visual material
visual communication
learning
instruction
Student learning

Keywords

  • document design
  • learning styles
  • visual communication
  • visual literacy
  • visuospatial thinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Communication
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Visuospatial thinking in the professional writing classroom. / Lauer, Claire; Sanchez, Christopher A.

In: Journal of Business and Technical Communication, Vol. 25, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 184-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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