Visual Supports to Promote Science Discourse for Middle and High School Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Juliet Barnett, Rebecca Trillo, Cori M. More

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Students with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are increasingly included in general education and are expected to access core content, including science. Development of science content knowledge, scientific literacy, and scientific thinking are areas emphasized in legislation as well as the National Science Education Standards as critical for all students, particularly as they progress to middle and high school. However, participation in science discourse is often challenging for students with ASD given their difficulties with communication. Moreover, evidence on teaching academic content, such as science, to students with disabilities is limited. In this article, the use of visual supports is described as an evidence-based practice to promote engagement in science discussions among students with high-functioning ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIntervention in School and Clinic
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

autism
Students
discourse
science
school
student
education standards
development of science
Education
general education
Evidence-Based Practice
evidence
Legislation
disability
literacy
legislation
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Teaching
Communication
participation

Keywords

  • academic
  • autism
  • disabilities
  • learning strategies
  • science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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