Visual framing of the early weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq

Applying the master war narrative to electronic and print images

Carol B. Schwalbe, Burton Silcock, Susan Keith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A content analysis of 1,822 images from U.S. mainstream media-network and cable television news outlets, news Web sites, newspapers, and news magazines-revealed that the visual framing of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 shifted from conflict to human interest. During the campaign's first 5 weeks, 5 distinct scenarios-shock and awe, conquering troops, hero, victory, and control-often coalesced around iconic images and supported a "master war narrative" identified by other scholars. These visual frames reflected a government-promoted patriotic perspective seen in media content at the outset of previous U.S. wars, from the Civil War through the Gulf War.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-465
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Television networks
invasion
Iraq
Websites
news
Lead
electronics
narrative
cable communication
gulf war
civil war
magazine
content analysis
newspaper
campaign
scenario
Television cables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Visual framing of the early weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq : Applying the master war narrative to electronic and print images. / Schwalbe, Carol B.; Silcock, Burton; Keith, Susan.

In: Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Vol. 52, No. 3, 07.2008, p. 448-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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