Visual framing of the early weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq: Applying the master war narrative to electronic and print images

Carol B. Schwalbe, Burton Silcock, Susan Keith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

A content analysis of 1,822 images from U.S. mainstream media-network and cable television news outlets, news Web sites, newspapers, and news magazines-revealed that the visual framing of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 shifted from conflict to human interest. During the campaign's first 5 weeks, 5 distinct scenarios-shock and awe, conquering troops, hero, victory, and control-often coalesced around iconic images and supported a "master war narrative" identified by other scholars. These visual frames reflected a government-promoted patriotic perspective seen in media content at the outset of previous U.S. wars, from the Civil War through the Gulf War.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-465
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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