Viruses associated with Antarctic wildlife: From serology based detection to identification of genomes using high throughput sequencing

Zoe E. Smeele, David G. Ainley, Arvind Varsani

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

Abstract

The Antarctic, sub-Antarctic islands and surrounding sea-ice provide a unique environment for the existence of organisms. Nonetheless, birds and seals of a variety of species inhabit them, particularly during their breeding seasons. Early research on Antarctic wildlife health, using serology-based assays, showed exposure to viruses in the families Birnaviridae, Flaviviridae, Herpesviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae circulating in seals (Phocidae), penguins (Spheniscidae), petrels (Procellariidae) and skuas (Stercorariidae). It is only during the last decade or so that polymerase chain reaction-based assays have been used to characterize viruses associated with Antarctic animals. Furthermore, it is only during the last five years that full/whole genomes of viruses (adenoviruses, anelloviruses, orthomyxoviruses, a papillomavirus, paramyoviruses, polyomaviruses and a togavirus) have been sequenced using Sanger sequencing or high throughput sequencing (HTS) approaches. This review summaries the knowledge of animal Antarctic virology and discusses potential future directions with the advent of HTS in virus discovery and ecology.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages91-105
Number of pages15
JournalVirus Research
Volume243
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

Fingerprint

Serology
Genome
Viruses
Spheniscidae
Orthomyxoviridae
Anelloviridae
Birnaviridae
Togaviridae
Paramyxoviridae
Earless Seals
Flaviviridae
Ice Cover
Polyomavirus
Virology
Herpesviridae
Ecology
Islands
Adenoviridae
Birds
Breeding

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • Penguin
  • Petrel
  • Seal
  • Sharp spined notothen
  • Wildlife disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Viruses associated with Antarctic wildlife : From serology based detection to identification of genomes using high throughput sequencing. / Smeele, Zoe E.; Ainley, David G.; Varsani, Arvind.

In: Virus Research, Vol. 243, 02.01.2018, p. 91-105.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

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