Virus-Derived Chemokine Modulating Protein Pre-Treatment Blocks Chemokine–Glycosaminoglycan Interactions and Significantly Reduces Transplant Immune Damage

Isabela R. Zanetti, Michelle Burgin, Liqiang Zhang, Steve T. Yeh, Sriram Ambadapadi, Jacquelyn Kilbourne, Jordan R. Yaron, Kenneth M. Lowe, Juliane Daggett-Vondras, David Fonseca, Ryan Boyd, Dara Wakefield, William Clapp, Efrem Lim, Hao Chen, Alexandra Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Immune cell invasion after the transplantation of solid organs is directed by chemokines binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), creating gradients that guide immune cell infiltration. Renal transplant is the preferred treatment for end stage renal failure, but organ supply is limited and allografts are often injured during transport, surgery or by cytokine storm in deceased donors. While treatment for adaptive immune responses during rejection is excellent, treatment for early inflammatory damage is less effective. Viruses have developed highly active chemokine inhibitors as a means to evade host responses. The myxoma virus-derived M-T7 protein blocks chemokine: GAG binding. We have investigated M-T7 and also antisense (ASO) as pre-treatments to modify chemokine: GAG interactions to reduce donor organ damage. Immediate pre-treatment of donor kidneys with M-T7 to block chemokine: GAG binding significantly reduced the inflammation and scarring in subcapsular and subcutaneous allografts. Antisense to N-deacetylase N-sulfotransferase1 (ASONdst1 ) that modifies heparan sulfate, was less effective with immediate pre-treatment, but reduced scarring and C4d staining with donor pre-treatment for 7 days before transplantation. Grafts with conditional Ndst1 deficiency had reduced inflammation. Local inhibition of chemokine: GAG binding in donor organs immediately prior to transplant provides a new approach to reduce transplant damage and graft loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number588
JournalPathogens
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • antisense
  • chemokine
  • glycosaminoglycans
  • inflammation
  • kidney
  • M-T7
  • rejection
  • transplant
  • virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Molecular Biology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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