Violence, schools, and dropping out: Racial and ethnic disparities in the educational consequence of student victimization

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Without a doubt, exposure to violence and victimization can be profoundly detrimental to the overall well-being and development of all youth. Moreover, violence and victimization that occurs within a school context is particularly alarming because a successful educational process is essential toward establishing socioeconomic success later in life. The educational consequence of exposure to violence and victimization at school is uncertain for racial and ethnic minority students. This study utilizes data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 and incorporates multilevel modeling techniques to examine the impact of violence and victimization at school on dropping out. The results indicate Black/African Americans and Latino American students who are victimized at school are at higher risk of dropping out. The implications of the evident racial and ethnic disparities in the relationship between victimization and dropping out within the U.S. school system are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3753-3772
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of interpersonal violence
Volume26
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • education
  • race and ethnicity
  • school crime
  • victimization
  • youth violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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