Violence and women's lives in Eastern Guatemala

A conceptual framework

Cecilia Menjívar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, I outline a framework to examine women's lives in eastern Guatemala, how multiple forms of violence coalesce in their everyday lives, and how these become normalized so as to become invisible and "natural." Women in western Guatemala, mostly indigenous, have received the attention of scholars who are interested in unearthing the brutality of state terror and its gendered expressions in Guatemala. My discussion builds on previous research conducted among indigenous groups in Guatemala and renders a depiction of the broad reach of violence, including expressions that are so commonplace as to become invisible. I argue that an examination of multiple forms of violence in the lives of women in eastern Guatemala, who are nonindigenous, exposes the deep and broad manifestations living in a society engulfed in violence, thus depicting the long arm of violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-136
Number of pages28
JournalLatin American Research Review
Volume43
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Guatemala
violence
conceptual framework
state terror
everyday life
woman
Conceptual Framework
Conceptual framework
examination
Group
Invisible

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Violence and women's lives in Eastern Guatemala : A conceptual framework. / Menjívar, Cecilia.

In: Latin American Research Review, Vol. 43, No. 3, 2008, p. 109-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{05adf035cb9b4ccfaa7a3c0e62bb55a8,
title = "Violence and women's lives in Eastern Guatemala: A conceptual framework",
abstract = "In this article, I outline a framework to examine women's lives in eastern Guatemala, how multiple forms of violence coalesce in their everyday lives, and how these become normalized so as to become invisible and {"}natural.{"} Women in western Guatemala, mostly indigenous, have received the attention of scholars who are interested in unearthing the brutality of state terror and its gendered expressions in Guatemala. My discussion builds on previous research conducted among indigenous groups in Guatemala and renders a depiction of the broad reach of violence, including expressions that are so commonplace as to become invisible. I argue that an examination of multiple forms of violence in the lives of women in eastern Guatemala, who are nonindigenous, exposes the deep and broad manifestations living in a society engulfed in violence, thus depicting the long arm of violence.",
author = "Cecilia Menj{\'i}var",
year = "2008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "109--136",
journal = "Latin American Research Review",
issn = "0023-8791",
publisher = "Latin American Studies Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Violence and women's lives in Eastern Guatemala

T2 - A conceptual framework

AU - Menjívar, Cecilia

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - In this article, I outline a framework to examine women's lives in eastern Guatemala, how multiple forms of violence coalesce in their everyday lives, and how these become normalized so as to become invisible and "natural." Women in western Guatemala, mostly indigenous, have received the attention of scholars who are interested in unearthing the brutality of state terror and its gendered expressions in Guatemala. My discussion builds on previous research conducted among indigenous groups in Guatemala and renders a depiction of the broad reach of violence, including expressions that are so commonplace as to become invisible. I argue that an examination of multiple forms of violence in the lives of women in eastern Guatemala, who are nonindigenous, exposes the deep and broad manifestations living in a society engulfed in violence, thus depicting the long arm of violence.

AB - In this article, I outline a framework to examine women's lives in eastern Guatemala, how multiple forms of violence coalesce in their everyday lives, and how these become normalized so as to become invisible and "natural." Women in western Guatemala, mostly indigenous, have received the attention of scholars who are interested in unearthing the brutality of state terror and its gendered expressions in Guatemala. My discussion builds on previous research conducted among indigenous groups in Guatemala and renders a depiction of the broad reach of violence, including expressions that are so commonplace as to become invisible. I argue that an examination of multiple forms of violence in the lives of women in eastern Guatemala, who are nonindigenous, exposes the deep and broad manifestations living in a society engulfed in violence, thus depicting the long arm of violence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55049102989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55049102989&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 109

EP - 136

JO - Latin American Research Review

JF - Latin American Research Review

SN - 0023-8791

IS - 3

ER -