Verbal conditioning: Transfer of training in a therapy-like situation

Richard I. Lanyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In an attempt to demonstrate transfer of conditioned verbal responses, college females were interviewed concerning childhood experiences and were given social approval either following content responses ("parent words"), affect responses ("emotional words"), or at a constant interval. A 2nd E in another room then administered a 100-item sentence-completion task which evoked similar responses. For content responses, contingent approval increased production during the interview but not on the transfer task. For affect responses, contingent approval had no significant effect, although mere participation in the interview increased production on the sentence-completion task. Results thus failed to support the utility of the verbal conditioning technique in producing lasting behavior change. It was suggested that future work should adhere more closely to the methodology of operant research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-34
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1967
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interviews
Therapeutics
Research
Transfer (Psychology)
Conditioning (Psychology)

Keywords

  • affect responses
  • conditioned verbal responses
  • content responses
  • social approval
  • transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Verbal conditioning : Transfer of training in a therapy-like situation. / Lanyon, Richard I.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 02.1967, p. 30-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4865d0cf80d4451498d50f81acfae60b,
title = "Verbal conditioning: Transfer of training in a therapy-like situation",
abstract = "In an attempt to demonstrate transfer of conditioned verbal responses, college females were interviewed concerning childhood experiences and were given social approval either following content responses ({"}parent words{"}), affect responses ({"}emotional words{"}), or at a constant interval. A 2nd E in another room then administered a 100-item sentence-completion task which evoked similar responses. For content responses, contingent approval increased production during the interview but not on the transfer task. For affect responses, contingent approval had no significant effect, although mere participation in the interview increased production on the sentence-completion task. Results thus failed to support the utility of the verbal conditioning technique in producing lasting behavior change. It was suggested that future work should adhere more closely to the methodology of operant research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).",
keywords = "affect responses, conditioned verbal responses, content responses, social approval, transfer",
author = "Lanyon, {Richard I.}",
year = "1967",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1037/h0020081",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "30--34",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Psychology",
issn = "0021-843X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Verbal conditioning

T2 - Transfer of training in a therapy-like situation

AU - Lanyon, Richard I.

PY - 1967/2

Y1 - 1967/2

N2 - In an attempt to demonstrate transfer of conditioned verbal responses, college females were interviewed concerning childhood experiences and were given social approval either following content responses ("parent words"), affect responses ("emotional words"), or at a constant interval. A 2nd E in another room then administered a 100-item sentence-completion task which evoked similar responses. For content responses, contingent approval increased production during the interview but not on the transfer task. For affect responses, contingent approval had no significant effect, although mere participation in the interview increased production on the sentence-completion task. Results thus failed to support the utility of the verbal conditioning technique in producing lasting behavior change. It was suggested that future work should adhere more closely to the methodology of operant research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

AB - In an attempt to demonstrate transfer of conditioned verbal responses, college females were interviewed concerning childhood experiences and were given social approval either following content responses ("parent words"), affect responses ("emotional words"), or at a constant interval. A 2nd E in another room then administered a 100-item sentence-completion task which evoked similar responses. For content responses, contingent approval increased production during the interview but not on the transfer task. For affect responses, contingent approval had no significant effect, although mere participation in the interview increased production on the sentence-completion task. Results thus failed to support the utility of the verbal conditioning technique in producing lasting behavior change. It was suggested that future work should adhere more closely to the methodology of operant research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

KW - affect responses

KW - conditioned verbal responses

KW - content responses

KW - social approval

KW - transfer

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0014051976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0014051976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/h0020081

DO - 10.1037/h0020081

M3 - Article

C2 - 6040795

AN - SCOPUS:0014051976

VL - 72

SP - 30

EP - 34

JO - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

SN - 0021-843X

IS - 1

ER -