Variations in the diurnal character of tropical cyclone wind speeds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant decline in diurnal temperature range (DTR) is identified along the Atlantic seaboard. Recent studies suggest that DTR changes demonstrate a human-created weekly cycle and may therefore be anthropogenic. In this study, we address whether there is a change in the diurnal variation in Tropical Cyclone (TC) wind speeds that is consistent with the DTR trend over land. Our analysis of 34 years of TC activity reveals variations such that the difference between day and night wind speeds of TCs has decreased over time. Our work gives limited support to the contention that TC diurnal wind speed differences are thermally driven and, hence, warmer night temperatures (a smaller DTR over time) are leading to stronger nighttime winds over time. Our study initiates investigation of potential influences of climate changes (such as DTR) on secondary climatic phenomena.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2005

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cyclones
tropical cyclone
wind velocity
temperature
night
diurnal variations
climate change
diurnal variation
trends
cycles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Variations in the diurnal character of tropical cyclone wind speeds. / Cerveny, Randall; Balling, Robert.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, No. 6, 28.03.2005, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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