Abstract

Birds are an anomaly among vertebrates as they are remarkably long-lived despite having naturally high blood glucose and metabolic rates. For mammals, hyperglycemia leads to oxidative stress and protein glycation. In contrast, many studies have shown that domestic and wild birds are relatively resistant to these glucose-mediated pathologies. Surprisingly very little research has examined protein glycation in birds of prey, which by nature consume a diet high in protein and fat that promotes gluconeogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate protein glycation and antioxidant concentrations in serum samples from several birds of prey (bald eagle (BAEA), red-tailed hawk (RTHA), barred owl (BAOW), great horned owl (GHOW)) as protein glycation can accelerate oxidative stress and vice versa. Serum glucose was measured using a commercially available assay, native albumin glycation was measured by mass spectrometry and various antioxidants (uric acid, vitamin E, retinol and several carotenoids) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Although glucose concentrations were not significantly different between species (p = 0.340), albumin glycation was significantly higher (p = 0.004) in BAEA (23.67 ± 1.90%) and BAOW (24.28 ± 1.43%) compared to RTHA (14.31 ± 0.63%). Of the antioxidants examined, lutein was significantly higher in BAOW (p = 0.008). BAEA had the highest beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations (p < 0.005). The high concentrations of antioxidants in these birds of prey relative to other birds likely helps protect from complications that may otherwise arise from having high glucose and protein glycation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-28
Number of pages11
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume210
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Raptors
Strigiformes
Birds
Blood Proteins
Antioxidants
Eagles
Plasmas
Hawks
Glucose
Proteins
Oxidative stress
Albumins
Oxidative Stress
Lutein
Gluconeogenesis
beta Carotene
Carotenoids
Heat-Shock Proteins
Uric Acid
Serum

Keywords

  • Albumin
  • Antioxidant
  • Bird of prey
  • Glycation
  • Raptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Variations in native protein glycation and plasma antioxidants in several birds of prey. / Ingram, Tana; Zuck, Jessica; Borges, Chad; Redig, Patrick; Sweazea, Karen.

In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 210, 01.08.2017, p. 18-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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