Variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations - Relationship with history and epidemiology

Juliana Dal Ri Lindenau, Francisco Mauro Salzano, Ana Hurtado, Kim Hill, Maria Luiza Petzl-Erler, Luiza Tamie Tsuneto, Mara Helena Hutz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives The immune system of a host, defending him/her against invading pathogens, has two main subsystems: innate immunity and acquired immunity. There are several evidences showing that Native American populations are immunologically different from non-Native populations. Our aim was to describe the variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations. Materials and Methods We investigated heterozygozities and patterns of population differentiation (FST) of 14 polymorphisms related to the innate immune response in five Native American populations (Aché, Guarani-Kaiowá, Guarani-Ñandeva, Kaingang, and Xavante) and the results were compared with the three major world population data (YRI, CEU, and CHB) available at the 1,000 genomes database. Results Mean heterozygosities ranged between 0.241 ± 0.057 (Aché) and 0.343 ± 0.033 (Kaingang), but no significant differences were observed (Friedman test, P = 0.197). Mean heterozygosities were also not significantly different when Amerindians were pooled and compared with the 1000 genomes populations (Friedman test, P = 0.506). When the Native American populations were grouped as Amerindians, a significantly higher FST value (0.194) was observed between the Amerindian and African populations. The Ewens-Watterson neutrality test showed that these markers are not under strong selective pressure. Discussion Native American populations present similar levels of heterozygosity as those of other continents, but are different from Africans in the frequency of polymorphisms of innate immune genes. This higher differentiation is probably due to demographic processes that occurred during the out-of-Africa event.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)722-728
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume159
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

North American Indians
epidemiology
Immune System
Epidemiology
History
history
Population
Genes
immunity
Innate Immunity
Genome
world population
neutrality
subsystem
Adaptive Immunity
Demography
Databases
event
present

Keywords

  • Amerindian demography
  • Amerindians
  • innate immune genes
  • natural selection
  • pathogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations - Relationship with history and epidemiology. / Lindenau, Juliana Dal Ri; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Hurtado, Ana; Hill, Kim; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie; Hutz, Mara Helena.

In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 159, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 722-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindenau, Juliana Dal Ri ; Salzano, Francisco Mauro ; Hurtado, Ana ; Hill, Kim ; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza ; Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie ; Hutz, Mara Helena. / Variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations - Relationship with history and epidemiology. In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 2016 ; Vol. 159, No. 4. pp. 722-728.
@article{d6c0f6b0fdb1445b8918334d6a565c93,
title = "Variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations - Relationship with history and epidemiology",
abstract = "Objectives The immune system of a host, defending him/her against invading pathogens, has two main subsystems: innate immunity and acquired immunity. There are several evidences showing that Native American populations are immunologically different from non-Native populations. Our aim was to describe the variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations. Materials and Methods We investigated heterozygozities and patterns of population differentiation (FST) of 14 polymorphisms related to the innate immune response in five Native American populations (Ach{\'e}, Guarani-Kaiow{\'a}, Guarani-{\~N}andeva, Kaingang, and Xavante) and the results were compared with the three major world population data (YRI, CEU, and CHB) available at the 1,000 genomes database. Results Mean heterozygosities ranged between 0.241 ± 0.057 (Ach{\'e}) and 0.343 ± 0.033 (Kaingang), but no significant differences were observed (Friedman test, P = 0.197). Mean heterozygosities were also not significantly different when Amerindians were pooled and compared with the 1000 genomes populations (Friedman test, P = 0.506). When the Native American populations were grouped as Amerindians, a significantly higher FST value (0.194) was observed between the Amerindian and African populations. The Ewens-Watterson neutrality test showed that these markers are not under strong selective pressure. Discussion Native American populations present similar levels of heterozygosity as those of other continents, but are different from Africans in the frequency of polymorphisms of innate immune genes. This higher differentiation is probably due to demographic processes that occurred during the out-of-Africa event.",
keywords = "Amerindian demography, Amerindians, innate immune genes, natural selection, pathogens",
author = "Lindenau, {Juliana Dal Ri} and Salzano, {Francisco Mauro} and Ana Hurtado and Kim Hill and Petzl-Erler, {Maria Luiza} and Tsuneto, {Luiza Tamie} and Hutz, {Mara Helena}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/ajpa.22917",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "159",
pages = "722--728",
journal = "American Journal of Physical Anthropology",
issn = "0002-9483",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations - Relationship with history and epidemiology

AU - Lindenau, Juliana Dal Ri

AU - Salzano, Francisco Mauro

AU - Hurtado, Ana

AU - Hill, Kim

AU - Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

AU - Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie

AU - Hutz, Mara Helena

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Objectives The immune system of a host, defending him/her against invading pathogens, has two main subsystems: innate immunity and acquired immunity. There are several evidences showing that Native American populations are immunologically different from non-Native populations. Our aim was to describe the variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations. Materials and Methods We investigated heterozygozities and patterns of population differentiation (FST) of 14 polymorphisms related to the innate immune response in five Native American populations (Aché, Guarani-Kaiowá, Guarani-Ñandeva, Kaingang, and Xavante) and the results were compared with the three major world population data (YRI, CEU, and CHB) available at the 1,000 genomes database. Results Mean heterozygosities ranged between 0.241 ± 0.057 (Aché) and 0.343 ± 0.033 (Kaingang), but no significant differences were observed (Friedman test, P = 0.197). Mean heterozygosities were also not significantly different when Amerindians were pooled and compared with the 1000 genomes populations (Friedman test, P = 0.506). When the Native American populations were grouped as Amerindians, a significantly higher FST value (0.194) was observed between the Amerindian and African populations. The Ewens-Watterson neutrality test showed that these markers are not under strong selective pressure. Discussion Native American populations present similar levels of heterozygosity as those of other continents, but are different from Africans in the frequency of polymorphisms of innate immune genes. This higher differentiation is probably due to demographic processes that occurred during the out-of-Africa event.

AB - Objectives The immune system of a host, defending him/her against invading pathogens, has two main subsystems: innate immunity and acquired immunity. There are several evidences showing that Native American populations are immunologically different from non-Native populations. Our aim was to describe the variability of innate immune system genes in Native American populations. Materials and Methods We investigated heterozygozities and patterns of population differentiation (FST) of 14 polymorphisms related to the innate immune response in five Native American populations (Aché, Guarani-Kaiowá, Guarani-Ñandeva, Kaingang, and Xavante) and the results were compared with the three major world population data (YRI, CEU, and CHB) available at the 1,000 genomes database. Results Mean heterozygosities ranged between 0.241 ± 0.057 (Aché) and 0.343 ± 0.033 (Kaingang), but no significant differences were observed (Friedman test, P = 0.197). Mean heterozygosities were also not significantly different when Amerindians were pooled and compared with the 1000 genomes populations (Friedman test, P = 0.506). When the Native American populations were grouped as Amerindians, a significantly higher FST value (0.194) was observed between the Amerindian and African populations. The Ewens-Watterson neutrality test showed that these markers are not under strong selective pressure. Discussion Native American populations present similar levels of heterozygosity as those of other continents, but are different from Africans in the frequency of polymorphisms of innate immune genes. This higher differentiation is probably due to demographic processes that occurred during the out-of-Africa event.

KW - Amerindian demography

KW - Amerindians

KW - innate immune genes

KW - natural selection

KW - pathogens

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84960262721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84960262721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ajpa.22917

DO - 10.1002/ajpa.22917

M3 - Article

VL - 159

SP - 722

EP - 728

JO - American Journal of Physical Anthropology

JF - American Journal of Physical Anthropology

SN - 0002-9483

IS - 4

ER -