Vapor generation in a nanoparticle liquid suspension using a focused, continuous laser

Robert A. Taylor, Patrick Phelan, Todd Otanicar, Ronald Adrian, Ravi S. Prasher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This letter discusses experimentation with optically induced phase change in nanoparticle liquid suspensions-commonly termed nanofluids. Four different types of nanofluids at five concentrations were exposed to a ∼120 mW, 532 nm laser beam to determine the minimum laser flux needed to create vapor. Laser irradiance was varied between 0-770 W cm-2. While the experiments were simple, they involved many complex, interrelated physical phenomena, including: subcooled boiling, thermal driven particle/bubble motion, nanoparticle radiative absorption/scattering, and nanoparticle clumping. Such phenomena could enable novel solar collectors in which the working fluid directly absorbs energy and undergoes phase change in a single step.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number161907
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume95
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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vapors
nanoparticles
liquids
lasers
solar collectors
working fluids
experimentation
irradiance
boiling
bubbles
laser beams
scattering
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Vapor generation in a nanoparticle liquid suspension using a focused, continuous laser. / Taylor, Robert A.; Phelan, Patrick; Otanicar, Todd; Adrian, Ronald; Prasher, Ravi S.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 95, No. 16, 161907, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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