Value-Expressive Volunteer Motivation and Volunteering by Older Adults: Relationships With Religiosity and Spirituality

Morris A. Okun, Holly O'Rourke, Brian Keller, Kathryn Johnson, Craig Enders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. Method. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Results. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p <.001) positive predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation. Value-expressive volunteer motivation and religiosity were significant (p <.001) positive predictors, whereas spirituality was a significant (p <.001) negative predictor, of volunteering. Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p <.05) but did not moderate the relation between spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation (p > .45). Discussion. Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)860-870
Number of pages11
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Spirituality
spirituality
Motivation
Volunteers
Values
personality traits
health risk
health behavior
risk behavior
shortage
longitudinal study
Health
Risk-Taking
Longitudinal Studies
Personality
regression
Regression Analysis
Demography
health

Keywords

  • Older adults
  • Religiosity
  • Spirituality
  • Value-expressive motivation
  • Volunteering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Value-Expressive Volunteer Motivation and Volunteering by Older Adults: Relationships With Religiosity and Spirituality",
abstract = "Objectives. This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. Method. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Results. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p <.001) positive predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation. Value-expressive volunteer motivation and religiosity were significant (p <.001) positive predictors, whereas spirituality was a significant (p <.001) negative predictor, of volunteering. Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p <.05) but did not moderate the relation between spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation (p > .45). Discussion. Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed.",
keywords = "Older adults, Religiosity, Spirituality, Value-expressive motivation, Volunteering",
author = "Okun, {Morris A.} and Holly O'Rourke and Brian Keller and Kathryn Johnson and Craig Enders",
year = "2015",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Value-Expressive Volunteer Motivation and Volunteering by Older Adults

T2 - Relationships With Religiosity and Spirituality

AU - Okun, Morris A.

AU - O'Rourke, Holly

AU - Keller, Brian

AU - Johnson, Kathryn

AU - Enders, Craig

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Objectives. This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. Method. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Results. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p <.001) positive predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation. Value-expressive volunteer motivation and religiosity were significant (p <.001) positive predictors, whereas spirituality was a significant (p <.001) negative predictor, of volunteering. Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p <.05) but did not moderate the relation between spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation (p > .45). Discussion. Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed.

AB - Objectives. This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. Method. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Results. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p <.001) positive predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation. Value-expressive volunteer motivation and religiosity were significant (p <.001) positive predictors, whereas spirituality was a significant (p <.001) negative predictor, of volunteering. Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p <.05) but did not moderate the relation between spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation (p > .45). Discussion. Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed.

KW - Older adults

KW - Religiosity

KW - Spirituality

KW - Value-expressive motivation

KW - Volunteering

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