Abstract

Aim To evaluate the validity of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) and Exercise Vital Sign (EVS) questionnaire against accelerometer-determined time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among African-American (AA) women. Background Limited research has evaluated the validity of brief physical activity (PA) questionnaires among AA women. Since the validity of PA questionnaires may differ among members of varying racial/ethnic groups, research is needed to explore the validity of self-report PA measures among AA women. Methods A total of 30 AA women [M age=35.5±5.3; M body mass index (BMI)=31.1±7.8] wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Pensacola FL, USA) for seven days and completed both the SBAS and EVS at two different assessment periods (T1 and T2). Criterion validity was calculated using Spearman's rank order correlations between each questionnaire score and accelerometer-measured MVPA. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using accelerometer-measured MVPA as the criterion to determine the ability of each questionnaire to predict whether or not a participant was meeting the 2008 US PA Guidelines. Findings Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and minutes of accelerometer-measured MVPA were low (EVS, r=0.27 at T1 and r=0.26 at T2; SBAS, r=0.10 at T1 and r=0.28 at T2) and not statistically significant (P's>0.05). The EVS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 27, 89, 59, and 68% at T1 and 33, 74, 38, and 70% at T2, respectively. The SBAS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were 18, 79, 33, and 62% at T1 and 67, 58, 43, and 79% at T2. While both questionnaires may be useful in identifying AA women who do not meet the 2008 PA Guidelines, using the questionnaires to identify AA women meeting the PA Guidelines should be done with caution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-276
Number of pages12
JournalPrimary Health Care Research and Development
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

African Americans
Exercise
Vital Signs
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sensitivity and Specificity
Ethnic Groups
Research
Self Report
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • black
  • exercise
  • female
  • minority health
  • physical activity assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Validity of two brief physical activity questionnaires with accelerometers among African-American women. / Joseph, Rodney; Keller, Colleen; Adams, Marc; Ainsworth, Barbara.

In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, Vol. 17, No. 3, 2016, p. 265-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fbd0b1be51664a2fb793fd3b301c557d,
title = "Validity of two brief physical activity questionnaires with accelerometers among African-American women",
abstract = "Aim To evaluate the validity of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) and Exercise Vital Sign (EVS) questionnaire against accelerometer-determined time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among African-American (AA) women. Background Limited research has evaluated the validity of brief physical activity (PA) questionnaires among AA women. Since the validity of PA questionnaires may differ among members of varying racial/ethnic groups, research is needed to explore the validity of self-report PA measures among AA women. Methods A total of 30 AA women [M age=35.5±5.3; M body mass index (BMI)=31.1±7.8] wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Pensacola FL, USA) for seven days and completed both the SBAS and EVS at two different assessment periods (T1 and T2). Criterion validity was calculated using Spearman's rank order correlations between each questionnaire score and accelerometer-measured MVPA. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using accelerometer-measured MVPA as the criterion to determine the ability of each questionnaire to predict whether or not a participant was meeting the 2008 US PA Guidelines. Findings Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and minutes of accelerometer-measured MVPA were low (EVS, r=0.27 at T1 and r=0.26 at T2; SBAS, r=0.10 at T1 and r=0.28 at T2) and not statistically significant (P's>0.05). The EVS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 27, 89, 59, and 68{\%} at T1 and 33, 74, 38, and 70{\%} at T2, respectively. The SBAS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were 18, 79, 33, and 62{\%} at T1 and 67, 58, 43, and 79{\%} at T2. While both questionnaires may be useful in identifying AA women who do not meet the 2008 PA Guidelines, using the questionnaires to identify AA women meeting the PA Guidelines should be done with caution.",
keywords = "black, exercise, female, minority health, physical activity assessment",
author = "Rodney Joseph and Colleen Keller and Marc Adams and Barbara Ainsworth",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1017/S1463423615000390",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "265--276",
journal = "Primary health care research & development",
issn = "1463-4236",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validity of two brief physical activity questionnaires with accelerometers among African-American women

AU - Joseph, Rodney

AU - Keller, Colleen

AU - Adams, Marc

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Aim To evaluate the validity of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) and Exercise Vital Sign (EVS) questionnaire against accelerometer-determined time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among African-American (AA) women. Background Limited research has evaluated the validity of brief physical activity (PA) questionnaires among AA women. Since the validity of PA questionnaires may differ among members of varying racial/ethnic groups, research is needed to explore the validity of self-report PA measures among AA women. Methods A total of 30 AA women [M age=35.5±5.3; M body mass index (BMI)=31.1±7.8] wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Pensacola FL, USA) for seven days and completed both the SBAS and EVS at two different assessment periods (T1 and T2). Criterion validity was calculated using Spearman's rank order correlations between each questionnaire score and accelerometer-measured MVPA. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using accelerometer-measured MVPA as the criterion to determine the ability of each questionnaire to predict whether or not a participant was meeting the 2008 US PA Guidelines. Findings Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and minutes of accelerometer-measured MVPA were low (EVS, r=0.27 at T1 and r=0.26 at T2; SBAS, r=0.10 at T1 and r=0.28 at T2) and not statistically significant (P's>0.05). The EVS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 27, 89, 59, and 68% at T1 and 33, 74, 38, and 70% at T2, respectively. The SBAS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were 18, 79, 33, and 62% at T1 and 67, 58, 43, and 79% at T2. While both questionnaires may be useful in identifying AA women who do not meet the 2008 PA Guidelines, using the questionnaires to identify AA women meeting the PA Guidelines should be done with caution.

AB - Aim To evaluate the validity of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) and Exercise Vital Sign (EVS) questionnaire against accelerometer-determined time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among African-American (AA) women. Background Limited research has evaluated the validity of brief physical activity (PA) questionnaires among AA women. Since the validity of PA questionnaires may differ among members of varying racial/ethnic groups, research is needed to explore the validity of self-report PA measures among AA women. Methods A total of 30 AA women [M age=35.5±5.3; M body mass index (BMI)=31.1±7.8] wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (ActiGraph, LLC, Pensacola FL, USA) for seven days and completed both the SBAS and EVS at two different assessment periods (T1 and T2). Criterion validity was calculated using Spearman's rank order correlations between each questionnaire score and accelerometer-measured MVPA. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using accelerometer-measured MVPA as the criterion to determine the ability of each questionnaire to predict whether or not a participant was meeting the 2008 US PA Guidelines. Findings Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and minutes of accelerometer-measured MVPA were low (EVS, r=0.27 at T1 and r=0.26 at T2; SBAS, r=0.10 at T1 and r=0.28 at T2) and not statistically significant (P's>0.05). The EVS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 27, 89, 59, and 68% at T1 and 33, 74, 38, and 70% at T2, respectively. The SBAS had sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were 18, 79, 33, and 62% at T1 and 67, 58, 43, and 79% at T2. While both questionnaires may be useful in identifying AA women who do not meet the 2008 PA Guidelines, using the questionnaires to identify AA women meeting the PA Guidelines should be done with caution.

KW - black

KW - exercise

KW - female

KW - minority health

KW - physical activity assessment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014437313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85014437313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1463423615000390

DO - 10.1017/S1463423615000390

M3 - Article

C2 - 26178779

AN - SCOPUS:85014437313

VL - 17

SP - 265

EP - 276

JO - Primary health care research & development

JF - Primary health care research & development

SN - 1463-4236

IS - 3

ER -