Using the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program to further understand the relationship between drug use and gang membership

Charles Katz, Vincent Webb, Scott Decker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the relationship between drug use and gang member-ship using data from the Arizona Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program, which collects both self-report and hard measures (i.e., urinalysis) of drug use. Our analyses revealed that self-reported recent drug use (i.e., drug use in the past three days) and urinalysis outcomes were similarly associated with the gang-membership variables. These findings suggest that self-reported data obtained from gang members is a particularly robust method for gathering information on their recent behavior. Additionally, our results were supportive of the social facilitation model, showing that current gang members were significantly more likely to use marijuana and cocaine compared with former gang members. The implications for policy and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-88
Number of pages31
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program
  • Drug use
  • Gang membership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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