Using test scores to evaluate and hold school teachers accountable in New Mexico

Tray J. Geiger, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley, Jessica Holloway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

For this study, researchers critically reviewed documents pertaining to the highest profile of the 15 teacher evaluation lawsuits that occurred throughout the U.S. as pertaining to the use of student test scores to evaluate teachers. In New Mexico, teacher plaintiffs contested how they were being evaluated and held accountable using a homegrown value-added model (VAM) to hold them accountable for their students’ test scores. Researchers examined court documents using six key measurement concepts (i.e., reliability, validity [i.e., convergent-related evidence], potential for bias, fairness, transparency, and consequential validity) defined by the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing and found evidence of issues within both the court documents as well as the statistical analyses researchers conducted on the first three measurement concepts (i.e., reliability, validity [i.e., convergent-related evidence], and potential for bias).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-235
Number of pages49
JournalEducational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Convergent-related evidence
  • Educational policy
  • Reliability
  • Teacher accountability
  • Teacher evaluation
  • Validity
  • Value-added models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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