Using spiritually modified cognitive-behavioral therapy in substance dependence treatment: Therapists' and clients' perceptions of the presumed benefits and limitations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that has been modified to incorporate clients' spiritual beliefs and practices has been used to treat a variety of problems. This study examines the utility of this modality with the treatment of alcohol dependence and other forms of substance abuse. Toward this end, six focus groups (three therapist groups and three client groups) were conducted to identify the presumed benefits and limitations of using spiritually modified CBT in substance dependence treatment. In terms of benefits, spiritually modified CBT was perceived to enhance outcomes through operationalizing horizontal and vertical sources of social support, divine coping resources, and spiritual motivation. Potential challenges include the risk of therapists inadvertently imposing their own beliefs during the modification process and the possibility of offending clients when conflicts in belief systems emerge, particularly in group setting. The article concludes by providing suggestions for incorporating spiritually modified CBT into treatment and develops a number of illustrative examples of spiritually modified CBT self-statements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-210
Number of pages11
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Focus groups
  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)

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