Using sit-stand workstations to decrease sedentary time in office workers: A randomized crossover trial

Nirjhar Dutta, Gabriel A. Koepp, Steven D. Stovitz, James A. Levine, Mark A. Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether installation of sit-stand desks (SSDs) could lead to decreased sitting time during the workday among sedentary office workers. Methods: A randomized cross-over trial was conducted from January to April, 2012 at a business in Minneapolis. 28 (nine men, 26 full-time) sedentary office workers took part in a 4 week intervention period which included the use of SSDs to gradually replace 50% of sitting time with standing during the workday. Physical activity was the primary outcome. Mood, energy level, fatigue, appetite, dietary intake, and productivity were explored as secondary outcomes. Results: The intervention reduced sitting time at work by 21% (95% CI 18%-25%) and sedentary time by 4.8 min/work-hr (95% CI 4.1-5.4 min/work-hr). For a 40 h work-week, this translates into replacement of 8 h of sitting time with standing and sedentary time being reduced by 3.2 h. Activity level during non-work hours did not change. The intervention also increased overall sense of well-being, energy, decreased fatigue, had no impact on productivity, and reduced appetite and dietary intake. The workstations were popular with the participants. Conclusion: The SSD intervention was successful in increasing work-time activity level, without changing activity level during non-work hours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6653-6665
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 25 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Cross-Over Studies
Appetite
Fatigue
Exercise

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Dietary assessment
  • Sedentary time
  • Sit stand desk
  • Work place intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Using sit-stand workstations to decrease sedentary time in office workers : A randomized crossover trial. / Dutta, Nirjhar; Koepp, Gabriel A.; Stovitz, Steven D.; Levine, James A.; Pereira, Mark A.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 11, No. 7, 25.06.2014, p. 6653-6665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dutta, Nirjhar ; Koepp, Gabriel A. ; Stovitz, Steven D. ; Levine, James A. ; Pereira, Mark A. / Using sit-stand workstations to decrease sedentary time in office workers : A randomized crossover trial. In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 7. pp. 6653-6665.
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