Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design

Ann McKenna, Xaver Neumeyer, Wei Chen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Many engineering departments often struggle with meeting "the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context" (outcome h) that is required by ABET. The already packed curricula provide few opportunities to offer meaningful experiences to address this outcome, and most departments relegate this requirement to an early cornerstone or later capstone design experience as a result, making these courses an ineffective "catch all" for many ABET requirements. We address this issue by using the paradigm of product archaeology, defined as the process of reconstructing the lifecycle of a product - the customer requirements, design specifications, and manufacturing processes used to produce it - to understand the decisions that led to its development. By considering products as designed artifacts with a history rooted in their development, we embed context as a central component in developing design solutions. Specifically, in our work we have implemented several approaches to integrate contextual thinking into a senior level engineering design course. Following Kolb's model of experiential learning and an instructional framework adapted for product archaeology (inclusive of evaluate-explainprepare- excavate activities) we have restructured the course to embed specific and targeted reflection, dissection, and analysis activities so that students teams effectively address the global, economic, environmental, and societal factors in their design solutions. This paper provides the theoretical framework of our instructional approach, describes the specific instructional activities we implemented, and results from our pre and post survey assessments that describe the impact on students' understanding of contextual as well engineering design topics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
    Pages697-703
    Number of pages7
    Volume7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2011
    EventASME 2011 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2011 - Washington, DC, United States
    Duration: Aug 28 2011Aug 31 2011

    Other

    OtherASME 2011 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2011
    CountryUnited States
    CityWashington, DC
    Period8/28/118/31/11

    Fingerprint

    Archaeology
    Engineering Design
    Requirements
    Economics
    Engineering
    Dissection
    Life Cycle
    Students
    Customers
    Manufacturing
    Paradigm
    Integrate
    Specification
    Curricula
    Necessary
    Byproducts
    Design
    Context
    Evaluate
    Education

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Modeling and Simulation

    Cite this

    McKenna, A., Neumeyer, X., & Chen, W. (2011). Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference (Vol. 7, pp. 697-703) https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2011-48242

    Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design. / McKenna, Ann; Neumeyer, Xaver; Chen, Wei.

    Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 7 2011. p. 697-703.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    McKenna, A, Neumeyer, X & Chen, W 2011, Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design. in Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. vol. 7, pp. 697-703, ASME 2011 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2011, Washington, DC, United States, 8/28/11. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2011-48242
    McKenna A, Neumeyer X, Chen W. Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 7. 2011. p. 697-703 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2011-48242
    McKenna, Ann ; Neumeyer, Xaver ; Chen, Wei. / Using product archaeology to embed context in engineering design. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 7 2011. pp. 697-703
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