Using points of presence to measure accessibility to the commercial Internet

Anthony Grubesic, Morton E. O'Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the Internet continues to grow, questions of accessibility and infrastructure equity persist. In the increasingly competitive telecommunications industry, profit-seeking firms continue to upgrade infrastructure in select market areas creating an uneven spatial distribution of access opportunities. This article utilizes a longitudinal database of Internet infrastructure development, highlighting fiber-optic backbone points of presence (POP) established by commercial Internet service providers to examine city accessibility to the commercial Internet. Results indicate that many larger metropolitan areas maintain dominant shares of telecom infrastructure, but several midsized metros are emerging as important centers for telecommunication interconnection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-278
Number of pages20
JournalProfessional Geographer
Volume54
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

accessibility
infrastructure
Internet
telecommunication
infrastructure development
fiber optics
interconnection
equity
metropolitan area
service provider
agglomeration area
communication technology
profit
spatial distribution
firm
market
industry

Keywords

  • City accessibility
  • Internet
  • Telecommunication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Using points of presence to measure accessibility to the commercial Internet. / Grubesic, Anthony; O'Kelly, Morton E.

In: Professional Geographer, Vol. 54, No. 2, 2002, p. 259-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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