Using online education technologies to support studio instruction

Diane Bender, Jon D. Vredevoogd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Technology is transforming the education and practice of architecture and design. The newest form of education is blended learning, which combines personal interaction from live class sessions with online education for greater learning flexibility (Abrams & Haefner, 2002). Reluctant to join the digital era are educators teaching studio courses (Bender & Good, 2003), who may be unaware of the possibilities and benefits of teaching with technology. The argument proposed in this study is that blended learning will enhance studio courses. Studios are unique learning environments embedded in an historical context. This article presents a process of infusing a traditional studio with online technologies. The result is a more streamlined course that enhances student learning, provides targeted instruction to individual students, serves a larger group of students than a traditional studio, and does not increase faculty workload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-122
Number of pages9
JournalEducational Technology and Society
Volume9
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Studios
Blended Learning
Education
instruction
Students
education
student
Teaching
workload
learning
learning environment
flexibility
educator
interaction
Group

Keywords

  • Faculty workload
  • Online education
  • Studio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Using online education technologies to support studio instruction. / Bender, Diane; Vredevoogd, Jon D.

In: Educational Technology and Society, Vol. 9, No. 4, 2006, p. 114-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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