Using non-cooperative games to simulate ethical tensions in climate policy negotiations

Susan G. Spierre, Thomas Seager, Evan Selinger, Jathan Sadowski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Successfully implementing a system of global compliance to mitigate climate change requires collective, social decision making that is unprecedented among people with radically different values and radically different needs. Our novel pedagogy in sustainability ethics teaches future professionals about complex moral problems in a way that leverages their interests in experiment and experience through the use of non-cooperative game theory. This approach emphasizes active, participatory, and experiential learning that is intended to more deeply immerse students in questions of fairness, justice, and equity in the context of sustainability. Through testing the games and preparing complimentary educational material, we have found that the developed non-cooperative games are particularly effective at replicating the ethical tensions surrounding the issue of climate change. This method of teaching ethics may prime students to participate in more effective group deliberation in real-world policy negotiations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 29 2011
Event2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: May 16 2011May 18 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011

Other

Other2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period5/16/115/18/11

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Keywords

  • Climate Change
  • Collective Action
  • International Climate Policy
  • Non-cooperative Game Theory
  • Sustainability Ethics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Spierre, S. G., Seager, T., Selinger, E., & Sadowski, J. (2011). Using non-cooperative games to simulate ethical tensions in climate policy negotiations. In Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011 [5936882] (Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSST.2011.5936882