Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project.

Deborah Helitzer, Cathleen Willging, Gary Hathorn, Jeannie Benally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has long promoted the logic model as a useful tool in an evaluator's portfolio. Because a logic model supports a systematic approach to designing interventions, it is equally useful for program planners. Undertaken with community stakeholders, a logic model process articulates the underlying foundations of a particular programmatic effort and enhances program design and evaluation. Most often presented as sequenced diagrams or flow charts, logic models demonstrate relationships among the following components: statement of a problem, various causal and mitigating factors related to that problem, available resources to address the problem, theoretical foundations of the selected intervention, intervention goals and planned activities, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes. This article describes a case example of how a logic model process was used to help community stakeholders on the Navajo Nation conceive, design, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalPublic health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)
Volume124 Suppl 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.)
Program Evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project. / Helitzer, Deborah; Willging, Cathleen; Hathorn, Gary; Benally, Jeannie.

In: Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974), Vol. 124 Suppl 1, 01.01.2009, p. 63-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Helitzer, Deborah ; Willging, Cathleen ; Hathorn, Gary ; Benally, Jeannie. / Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project. In: Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974). 2009 ; Vol. 124 Suppl 1. pp. 63-73.
@article{70d1980fb6c3421a92d42d6f50a2917c,
title = "Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project.",
abstract = "The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has long promoted the logic model as a useful tool in an evaluator's portfolio. Because a logic model supports a systematic approach to designing interventions, it is equally useful for program planners. Undertaken with community stakeholders, a logic model process articulates the underlying foundations of a particular programmatic effort and enhances program design and evaluation. Most often presented as sequenced diagrams or flow charts, logic models demonstrate relationships among the following components: statement of a problem, various causal and mitigating factors related to that problem, available resources to address the problem, theoretical foundations of the selected intervention, intervention goals and planned activities, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes. This article describes a case example of how a logic model process was used to help community stakeholders on the Navajo Nation conceive, design, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects.",
author = "Deborah Helitzer and Cathleen Willging and Gary Hathorn and Jeannie Benally",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/00333549091244S108",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "124 Suppl 1",
pages = "63--73",
journal = "Public Health Reports",
issn = "0033-3549",
publisher = "Association of Schools of Public Health",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project.

AU - Helitzer, Deborah

AU - Willging, Cathleen

AU - Hathorn, Gary

AU - Benally, Jeannie

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has long promoted the logic model as a useful tool in an evaluator's portfolio. Because a logic model supports a systematic approach to designing interventions, it is equally useful for program planners. Undertaken with community stakeholders, a logic model process articulates the underlying foundations of a particular programmatic effort and enhances program design and evaluation. Most often presented as sequenced diagrams or flow charts, logic models demonstrate relationships among the following components: statement of a problem, various causal and mitigating factors related to that problem, available resources to address the problem, theoretical foundations of the selected intervention, intervention goals and planned activities, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes. This article describes a case example of how a logic model process was used to help community stakeholders on the Navajo Nation conceive, design, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects.

AB - The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has long promoted the logic model as a useful tool in an evaluator's portfolio. Because a logic model supports a systematic approach to designing interventions, it is equally useful for program planners. Undertaken with community stakeholders, a logic model process articulates the underlying foundations of a particular programmatic effort and enhances program design and evaluation. Most often presented as sequenced diagrams or flow charts, logic models demonstrate relationships among the following components: statement of a problem, various causal and mitigating factors related to that problem, available resources to address the problem, theoretical foundations of the selected intervention, intervention goals and planned activities, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes. This article describes a case example of how a logic model process was used to help community stakeholders on the Navajo Nation conceive, design, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=69249208813&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=69249208813&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/00333549091244S108

DO - 10.1177/00333549091244S108

M3 - Article

VL - 124 Suppl 1

SP - 63

EP - 73

JO - Public Health Reports

JF - Public Health Reports

SN - 0033-3549

ER -