Using ILD or ITD cues for sound source localization and speech understanding in a complex listening environment by listeners with bilateral and with hearing-preservation cochlear implants

Louise H. Loiselle, Michael Dorman, William Yost, Sarah J. Cook, Rene H. Gifford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the role of interaural time differences and interaural level differences in (a) sound-source localization, and (b) speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment for listeners with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) and for listeners with hearing-preservation CIs. Methods: Eleven bilateral listeners with MED-EL (Durham, NC) CIs and 8 listeners with hearing-preservation CIs with symmetrical low frequency, acoustic hearing using the MED-EL or Cochlear device were evaluated using 2 tests designed to task binaural hearing, localization, and a simulated cocktail party. Access to interaural cues for localization was constrained by the use of low-pass, high-pass, and wideband noise stimuli. Results: Sound-source localization accuracy for listeners with bilateral CIs in response to the high-pass noise stimulus and sound-source localization accuracy for the listeners with hearing-preservation CIs in response to the low-pass noise stimulus did not differ significantly. Speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment improved for all listeners when interaural cues, either interaural time difference or interaural level difference, were available. Conclusions: The findings of the current study indicate that similar degrees of benefit to sound-source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments are possible with 2 very different rehabilitation strategies: the provision of bilateral CIs and the preservation of hearing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)810-818
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume59
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Sound Localization
Cochlear Implants
listener
Hearing
Cues
Noise
stimulus
Cochlea
Listeners
Localization
Cochlear Implant
Sound
Acoustics
acoustics
rehabilitation
Rehabilitation
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Using ILD or ITD cues for sound source localization and speech understanding in a complex listening environment by listeners with bilateral and with hearing-preservation cochlear implants. / Loiselle, Louise H.; Dorman, Michael; Yost, William; Cook, Sarah J.; Gifford, Rene H.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 59, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 810-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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