Using dual tasks to test immediate transfer of training between naturalistic movements

A proof-of-principle study

Sydney Schaefer, Catherine E. Lang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theories of motor learning predict that training a movement reduces the amount of attention needed for its performance (i.e., more automatic). If training one movement transfers, then the amount of attention needed for performing a second movement should also be reduced, as measured under dual task conditions. The authors purpose was to test whether dual task paradigms are feasible for detecting transfer of training between two naturalistic movements. Immediately following motor training, subjects improved performance of a second untrained movement under single and dual task conditions. Subjects with no training did not. Improved performance in the untrained movement was likely due to transfer, and suggests that dual tasks may be feasible for detecting transfer between naturalistic actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-327
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Learning
Transfer (Psychology)

Keywords

  • feasibility
  • motor training
  • naturalistic movement
  • transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biophysics
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Using dual tasks to test immediate transfer of training between naturalistic movements : A proof-of-principle study. / Schaefer, Sydney; Lang, Catherine E.

In: Journal of Motor Behavior, Vol. 44, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 313-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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