Using competitive protein adsorption to measure fibrinogen in undiluted human serum

Seokheun Choi, Ran Wang, Arad Lajevardi-Khosh, Junseok Chae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report a unique sensing mechanism based on competitive protein adsorption to measure fibrinogen, a cardiovascular biomarker, in undiluted human serum. The method uses physical adsorption of proteins to a surface rather than complex and time-consuming immobilization procedures. Two fibrinogen concentrations were differentiated in spiked in human serum [3.0 mg/ml (normal concentration) versus 3.2 mg/ml (abnormal concentration with heart disease)]. Real-time surface plasmon resonance signals were monitored as fibrinogen displaced a preadsorbed protein, IgM, on a hydrophobic gold surface. The relatively strong-affinity protein, IgM, was displaced primarily by fibrinogen and much less by other proteins in human serum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number253701
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume97
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

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