Using a Timed Motor Task to Predict One-Year Functional Decline in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

Sydney Y. Schaefer, Andrew Hooyman, Kevin Duff, Madeleine Hackney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Affordable, noninvasive methods of predicting functional decline are needed for individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease. This study tested whether a timed upper-extremity motor task predicted functional decline over one year in 79 adults diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Participants completed subjective and objective measures of daily functioning at baseline and one year later. Motor task performance and delayed memory were also evaluated at baseline. Motor task performance was a significant predictor of one-year follow-up daily functioning, improving model fits by 18- 35%. Thus, motor behavior has potential to be an affordable enrichment strategy that is sensitive to functional decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • functional decline
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • motor behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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