Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor

Mary R. Anderson-Rowland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arizona State University is primarily a commuter school and many of its students work. These factors contribute to a serious problem of retention for the University and the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. In an effort to increase retention rates and to improve student life, three years ago an engineering dorm floor was designated and advertised to incoming engineering students. During the first two years only a small number of engineering students were attracted to this style of living. Roommate assignments were done by chance. Last year, in an effort to improve the process, an interest and preference survey was developed for potential dormitory residents in an effort to increase the quality of roommate pairing. An unexpected result of the use of the survey was that three times as many students requested clustered engineering housing and completed the survey. The roommate survey is described and anecdotes from students given. Some results of a survey of the student satisfaction with the engineering cluster housing program are also presented. Minor changes to the survey are discussed and difficulties with the process and their solution are also addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference
PublisherIEEE
Pages500-504
Number of pages5
Volume1
StatePublished - 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 28th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Part 3 (of 3) - Tempe, AZ, USA
Duration: Nov 4 1998Nov 7 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 28th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Part 3 (of 3)
CityTempe, AZ, USA
Period11/4/9811/7/98

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Anderson-Rowland, M. R. (1998). Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 500-504). IEEE.

Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor. / Anderson-Rowland, Mary R.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 1 IEEE, 1998. p. 500-504.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Anderson-Rowland, MR 1998, Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. vol. 1, IEEE, pp. 500-504, Proceedings of the 1998 28th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Part 3 (of 3), Tempe, AZ, USA, 11/4/98.
Anderson-Rowland MR. Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 1. IEEE. 1998. p. 500-504
Anderson-Rowland, Mary R. / Using a roommate preference survey for students living on an engineering dorm floor. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 1 IEEE, 1998. pp. 500-504
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