Use of structured and unstructured data to identify contraceptive use in women veterans.

Julie A. Womack, Matthew Scotch, Sylvia N. Leung, Melissa Skanderson, Harini Bathulapalli, Sally G. Haskell, Cynthia A. Brandt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contraceptive use among women Veterans may not be adequately captured using administrative and pharmacy codes. Clinical progress notes may provide a useful alternative. The objectives of this study were to validate the use of administrative and pharmacy codes to identify contraceptive use in Veterans Health Administration data, and to determine the feasibility and validity of identifying contraceptive use in clinical progress notes. The study included women Veterans who participated in the Women Veterans Cohort Study, enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health Care System, completed a baseline survey, and had clinical progress notes from one year prior to survey completion. Contraceptive ICD-9-CM codes, V-codes, CPT codes, and pharmacy codes were identified. Progress notes were annotated to identify contraceptive use. Self-reported contraceptive use was identified from a baseline survey of health habits and healthcare practices and utilization. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were calculated comparing administrative and pharmacy contraceptive codes and progress note-based contraceptive information to self-report survey data. Results showed that administrative and pharmacy codes were specific but not sensitive for identifying contraceptive use. For example, oral contraceptive pill codes were highly specific (1.00) but not sensitive (0.41). Data from clinical progress notes demonstrated greater sensitivity and comparable specificity. For example, for oral contraceptive pills, progress notes were both specific (0.85) and sensitive (0.73). Results suggest that the best approach for identifying contraceptive use, through either administrative codes or progress notes, depends on the research question.

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Veterans
Contraceptive Agents
Oral Contraceptives
Current Procedural Terminology
Veterans Health
Delivery of Health Care
Sensitivity and Specificity
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
International Classification of Diseases
Self Report
Habits
Cohort Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Use of structured and unstructured data to identify contraceptive use in women veterans. / Womack, Julie A.; Scotch, Matthew; Leung, Sylvia N.; Skanderson, Melissa; Bathulapalli, Harini; Haskell, Sally G.; Brandt, Cynthia A.

In: Perspectives in health information management / AHIMA, American Health Information Management Association, Vol. 10, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Womack, Julie A. ; Scotch, Matthew ; Leung, Sylvia N. ; Skanderson, Melissa ; Bathulapalli, Harini ; Haskell, Sally G. ; Brandt, Cynthia A. / Use of structured and unstructured data to identify contraceptive use in women veterans. In: Perspectives in health information management / AHIMA, American Health Information Management Association. 2013 ; Vol. 10.
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