Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

Christiana Honsberg, M. A. Green

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The laser grooved, buried contact approach appears to be the only practical way yet suggested of transferring recent improvements in bulk silicon laboratory cells into commercial practice. Close to 1 MW of high efficiency modules have now been produced using this improved technology. To apply the technology to polycrystalline silicon wafers, some form of surface texturing is desirable. Laser texturing has been investigated with good results. However, mechanical texturing would appear to have economic advantages. A rear junction structure also has advantages for polycrystalline substrates in cases where the diffusion length is only about the half the substrate thickness. Such structures have also been successfully implemented using the laser grooved approach. More recently, the laser grooved, buried contact approach has been adapted for use with thin film silicon layers deposited onto supporting substrates or superstrates. The strength of this approach lies in its compatibility with a parallel multijunction cell design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaterials Science Forum
PublisherTrans Tech Publ
Pages311-318
Number of pages8
Volume173-174
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Semiconductor Processing and Characterization with Lasers - Stuttgart, Ger
Duration: Apr 18 1994Apr 20 1994

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Semiconductor Processing and Characterization with Lasers
CityStuttgart, Ger
Period4/18/944/20/94

Fingerprint

Silicon solar cells
Texturing
Fabrication
Lasers
Silicon
Substrates
Silicon wafers
Polysilicon
Thin films
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Honsberg, C., & Green, M. A. (1995). Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In Materials Science Forum (Vol. 173-174, pp. 311-318). Trans Tech Publ.

Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. / Honsberg, Christiana; Green, M. A.

Materials Science Forum. Vol. 173-174 Trans Tech Publ, 1995. p. 311-318.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Honsberg, C & Green, MA 1995, Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. in Materials Science Forum. vol. 173-174, Trans Tech Publ, pp. 311-318, Proceedings of the 1st International Symposium on Semiconductor Processing and Characterization with Lasers, Stuttgart, Ger, 4/18/94.
Honsberg C, Green MA. Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In Materials Science Forum. Vol. 173-174. Trans Tech Publ. 1995. p. 311-318
Honsberg, Christiana ; Green, M. A. / Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Materials Science Forum. Vol. 173-174 Trans Tech Publ, 1995. pp. 311-318
@inbook{f436985163e949b0bfe2c3765c5766b9,
title = "Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells",
abstract = "The laser grooved, buried contact approach appears to be the only practical way yet suggested of transferring recent improvements in bulk silicon laboratory cells into commercial practice. Close to 1 MW of high efficiency modules have now been produced using this improved technology. To apply the technology to polycrystalline silicon wafers, some form of surface texturing is desirable. Laser texturing has been investigated with good results. However, mechanical texturing would appear to have economic advantages. A rear junction structure also has advantages for polycrystalline substrates in cases where the diffusion length is only about the half the substrate thickness. Such structures have also been successfully implemented using the laser grooved approach. More recently, the laser grooved, buried contact approach has been adapted for use with thin film silicon layers deposited onto supporting substrates or superstrates. The strength of this approach lies in its compatibility with a parallel multijunction cell design.",
author = "Christiana Honsberg and Green, {M. A.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "173-174",
pages = "311--318",
booktitle = "Materials Science Forum",
publisher = "Trans Tech Publ",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Use of lasers in the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

AU - Honsberg, Christiana

AU - Green, M. A.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - The laser grooved, buried contact approach appears to be the only practical way yet suggested of transferring recent improvements in bulk silicon laboratory cells into commercial practice. Close to 1 MW of high efficiency modules have now been produced using this improved technology. To apply the technology to polycrystalline silicon wafers, some form of surface texturing is desirable. Laser texturing has been investigated with good results. However, mechanical texturing would appear to have economic advantages. A rear junction structure also has advantages for polycrystalline substrates in cases where the diffusion length is only about the half the substrate thickness. Such structures have also been successfully implemented using the laser grooved approach. More recently, the laser grooved, buried contact approach has been adapted for use with thin film silicon layers deposited onto supporting substrates or superstrates. The strength of this approach lies in its compatibility with a parallel multijunction cell design.

AB - The laser grooved, buried contact approach appears to be the only practical way yet suggested of transferring recent improvements in bulk silicon laboratory cells into commercial practice. Close to 1 MW of high efficiency modules have now been produced using this improved technology. To apply the technology to polycrystalline silicon wafers, some form of surface texturing is desirable. Laser texturing has been investigated with good results. However, mechanical texturing would appear to have economic advantages. A rear junction structure also has advantages for polycrystalline substrates in cases where the diffusion length is only about the half the substrate thickness. Such structures have also been successfully implemented using the laser grooved approach. More recently, the laser grooved, buried contact approach has been adapted for use with thin film silicon layers deposited onto supporting substrates or superstrates. The strength of this approach lies in its compatibility with a parallel multijunction cell design.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029211923&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029211923&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:0029211923

VL - 173-174

SP - 311

EP - 318

BT - Materials Science Forum

PB - Trans Tech Publ

ER -