Urinary PGE-M: A promising cancer biomarker

Dingzhi Wang, Raymond N. DuBois

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and targeted therapies are the keys to success in better cancer control and treatment. A big challenge remains to identify biomarkers for predicting who may have higher cancer risk and are able to respond to certain chemopreventive agents as well as for assessing a patient's response during treatment. Although a large body of evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cancer, it is unclear whether inflammatory biomarkers can be used to predict cancer risk, progression, and death. Considering the importance of the proinflammatory COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in inflammation and cancer, Morris and colleagues found that urinary PGE-M is positively associated with obesity, smoking, and lung metastases in patients with breast cancer (4). Along the same lines, Kim and colleagues showed a potential association between urinary PGE-M and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (beginning on page 511). In agreement with previous reports, their findings indicate that urinary PGE-M may serve as a promising biomarker for prognosticating cancer risk and disease progression.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)507-510
    Number of pages4
    JournalCancer Prevention Research
    Volume6
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2013

    Fingerprint

    Tumor Biomarkers
    Neoplasms
    Biomarkers
    Breast Neoplasms
    Inflammation
    Early Detection of Cancer
    Dinoprostone
    Disease Progression
    Therapeutics
    Obesity
    Smoking
    7-hydroxy-5,11-dioxotetranorprostane-1,16-dioic acid
    Neoplasm Metastasis
    Lung

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cancer Research
    • Oncology

    Cite this

    Urinary PGE-M : A promising cancer biomarker. / Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    In: Cancer Prevention Research, Vol. 6, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 507-510.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wang, Dingzhi ; DuBois, Raymond N. / Urinary PGE-M : A promising cancer biomarker. In: Cancer Prevention Research. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 507-510.
    @article{53bc14c66dd146e089b8b9186a649fb4,
    title = "Urinary PGE-M: A promising cancer biomarker",
    abstract = "Cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and targeted therapies are the keys to success in better cancer control and treatment. A big challenge remains to identify biomarkers for predicting who may have higher cancer risk and are able to respond to certain chemopreventive agents as well as for assessing a patient's response during treatment. Although a large body of evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cancer, it is unclear whether inflammatory biomarkers can be used to predict cancer risk, progression, and death. Considering the importance of the proinflammatory COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in inflammation and cancer, Morris and colleagues found that urinary PGE-M is positively associated with obesity, smoking, and lung metastases in patients with breast cancer (4). Along the same lines, Kim and colleagues showed a potential association between urinary PGE-M and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (beginning on page 511). In agreement with previous reports, their findings indicate that urinary PGE-M may serve as a promising biomarker for prognosticating cancer risk and disease progression.",
    author = "Dingzhi Wang and DuBois, {Raymond N.}",
    year = "2013",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0153",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "6",
    pages = "507--510",
    journal = "Cancer Prevention Research",
    issn = "1940-6207",
    publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Urinary PGE-M

    T2 - A promising cancer biomarker

    AU - Wang, Dingzhi

    AU - DuBois, Raymond N.

    PY - 2013/6

    Y1 - 2013/6

    N2 - Cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and targeted therapies are the keys to success in better cancer control and treatment. A big challenge remains to identify biomarkers for predicting who may have higher cancer risk and are able to respond to certain chemopreventive agents as well as for assessing a patient's response during treatment. Although a large body of evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cancer, it is unclear whether inflammatory biomarkers can be used to predict cancer risk, progression, and death. Considering the importance of the proinflammatory COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in inflammation and cancer, Morris and colleagues found that urinary PGE-M is positively associated with obesity, smoking, and lung metastases in patients with breast cancer (4). Along the same lines, Kim and colleagues showed a potential association between urinary PGE-M and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (beginning on page 511). In agreement with previous reports, their findings indicate that urinary PGE-M may serve as a promising biomarker for prognosticating cancer risk and disease progression.

    AB - Cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and targeted therapies are the keys to success in better cancer control and treatment. A big challenge remains to identify biomarkers for predicting who may have higher cancer risk and are able to respond to certain chemopreventive agents as well as for assessing a patient's response during treatment. Although a large body of evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cancer, it is unclear whether inflammatory biomarkers can be used to predict cancer risk, progression, and death. Considering the importance of the proinflammatory COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in inflammation and cancer, Morris and colleagues found that urinary PGE-M is positively associated with obesity, smoking, and lung metastases in patients with breast cancer (4). Along the same lines, Kim and colleagues showed a potential association between urinary PGE-M and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (beginning on page 511). In agreement with previous reports, their findings indicate that urinary PGE-M may serve as a promising biomarker for prognosticating cancer risk and disease progression.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878857014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878857014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0153

    DO - 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0153

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 23636051

    AN - SCOPUS:84878857014

    VL - 6

    SP - 507

    EP - 510

    JO - Cancer Prevention Research

    JF - Cancer Prevention Research

    SN - 1940-6207

    IS - 6

    ER -