Urban ecology: Advancing science and society

Colby J. Tanner, Frederick R. Adler, Nancy Grimm, Peter M. Groffman, Simon A. Levin, Jason Munshi-South, Diane E. Pataki, Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman, William G. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban ecology has quickly become established as a central part of ecological thinking. As cities continue to grow in size and number, two questions serve to unify this broad and multidisciplinary research landscape: (1) how can urban ecology contribute to the science of ecology, and (2) how can urban ecology be applied to make cities more livable and sustainable? In spite of the advances made thus far, there are many unexplored ways of integrating the science and application of urban ecology. Although scientists assess and make predictions regarding the connections between environmental and socioeconomic processes, practitioners involved in real-world application deal with urban planning and with designing ecosystem services to improve living conditions for all urban inhabitants and to make cities more sustainable. Research in urban ecosystems can be developed from many different perspectives, and we suggest that each perspective has something to offer both society and the science of ecology. We present several research perspectives and describe how these can integrate conceptual and applied aspects to bridge the figurative gaps between trees, buildings, and people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-581
Number of pages8
JournalFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

ecology
urban ecosystem
urban planning
ecosystem service
ecosystem services
urban ecology
science
society
socioeconomics
prediction
city
ecosystems
living condition
inhabitant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Tanner, C. J., Adler, F. R., Grimm, N., Groffman, P. M., Levin, S. A., Munshi-South, J., ... Wilson, W. G. (2014). Urban ecology: Advancing science and society. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 12(10), 574-581. https://doi.org/10.1890/140019

Urban ecology : Advancing science and society. / Tanner, Colby J.; Adler, Frederick R.; Grimm, Nancy; Groffman, Peter M.; Levin, Simon A.; Munshi-South, Jason; Pataki, Diane E.; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell; Wilson, William G.

In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 12, No. 10, 01.12.2014, p. 574-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanner, CJ, Adler, FR, Grimm, N, Groffman, PM, Levin, SA, Munshi-South, J, Pataki, DE, Pavao-Zuckerman, M & Wilson, WG 2014, 'Urban ecology: Advancing science and society', Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 574-581. https://doi.org/10.1890/140019
Tanner CJ, Adler FR, Grimm N, Groffman PM, Levin SA, Munshi-South J et al. Urban ecology: Advancing science and society. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2014 Dec 1;12(10):574-581. https://doi.org/10.1890/140019
Tanner, Colby J. ; Adler, Frederick R. ; Grimm, Nancy ; Groffman, Peter M. ; Levin, Simon A. ; Munshi-South, Jason ; Pataki, Diane E. ; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell ; Wilson, William G. / Urban ecology : Advancing science and society. In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 10. pp. 574-581.
@article{d1274858eca84f5fac837297749b2a94,
title = "Urban ecology: Advancing science and society",
abstract = "Urban ecology has quickly become established as a central part of ecological thinking. As cities continue to grow in size and number, two questions serve to unify this broad and multidisciplinary research landscape: (1) how can urban ecology contribute to the science of ecology, and (2) how can urban ecology be applied to make cities more livable and sustainable? In spite of the advances made thus far, there are many unexplored ways of integrating the science and application of urban ecology. Although scientists assess and make predictions regarding the connections between environmental and socioeconomic processes, practitioners involved in real-world application deal with urban planning and with designing ecosystem services to improve living conditions for all urban inhabitants and to make cities more sustainable. Research in urban ecosystems can be developed from many different perspectives, and we suggest that each perspective has something to offer both society and the science of ecology. We present several research perspectives and describe how these can integrate conceptual and applied aspects to bridge the figurative gaps between trees, buildings, and people.",
author = "Tanner, {Colby J.} and Adler, {Frederick R.} and Nancy Grimm and Groffman, {Peter M.} and Levin, {Simon A.} and Jason Munshi-South and Pataki, {Diane E.} and Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman and Wilson, {William G.}",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1890/140019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "574--581",
journal = "Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment",
issn = "1540-9295",
publisher = "Ecological Society of America",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urban ecology

T2 - Advancing science and society

AU - Tanner, Colby J.

AU - Adler, Frederick R.

AU - Grimm, Nancy

AU - Groffman, Peter M.

AU - Levin, Simon A.

AU - Munshi-South, Jason

AU - Pataki, Diane E.

AU - Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

AU - Wilson, William G.

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Urban ecology has quickly become established as a central part of ecological thinking. As cities continue to grow in size and number, two questions serve to unify this broad and multidisciplinary research landscape: (1) how can urban ecology contribute to the science of ecology, and (2) how can urban ecology be applied to make cities more livable and sustainable? In spite of the advances made thus far, there are many unexplored ways of integrating the science and application of urban ecology. Although scientists assess and make predictions regarding the connections between environmental and socioeconomic processes, practitioners involved in real-world application deal with urban planning and with designing ecosystem services to improve living conditions for all urban inhabitants and to make cities more sustainable. Research in urban ecosystems can be developed from many different perspectives, and we suggest that each perspective has something to offer both society and the science of ecology. We present several research perspectives and describe how these can integrate conceptual and applied aspects to bridge the figurative gaps between trees, buildings, and people.

AB - Urban ecology has quickly become established as a central part of ecological thinking. As cities continue to grow in size and number, two questions serve to unify this broad and multidisciplinary research landscape: (1) how can urban ecology contribute to the science of ecology, and (2) how can urban ecology be applied to make cities more livable and sustainable? In spite of the advances made thus far, there are many unexplored ways of integrating the science and application of urban ecology. Although scientists assess and make predictions regarding the connections between environmental and socioeconomic processes, practitioners involved in real-world application deal with urban planning and with designing ecosystem services to improve living conditions for all urban inhabitants and to make cities more sustainable. Research in urban ecosystems can be developed from many different perspectives, and we suggest that each perspective has something to offer both society and the science of ecology. We present several research perspectives and describe how these can integrate conceptual and applied aspects to bridge the figurative gaps between trees, buildings, and people.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84914181445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84914181445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1890/140019

DO - 10.1890/140019

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84914181445

VL - 12

SP - 574

EP - 581

JO - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

JF - Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

SN - 1540-9295

IS - 10

ER -