Ups and downs of alcohol use among first-year college students: Number of drinks, heavy drinking, and stumble and pass out drinking days

Jennifer L. Maggs, Lela Williams, Christine M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given the dynamic fluctuating nature of alcohol use among emerging adults (Del Boca, Darkes, Greenbaum, & Goldman, 2004), patterns of alcohol use were modeled across 70. days in an intensive repeated-measures diary design. Two hundred first-year college students provided 10 weekly reports of their daily alcohol consumption via computer-assisted telephone interviews. Multi-level models demonstrated large within-person variability across days in drinks consumed, binge drinking, and days exceeding self-reported limits for stumbling around and passing out; these outcome variables were predicted by weekdays vs. weekend days (within-person) and gender, age of drinking initiation, fraternity/sorority membership, and alcohol motivations (between-persons). Repeated measurement of alternate indicators of alcohol use permits the examination of novel and important questions about alcohol use and abuse particularly in young adult and other erratically drinking populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-202
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Drinking
Alcohols
Students
Binge Drinking
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism
Motivation
Young Adult
Interviews
Telephone
Population

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • Daily diary
  • Emerging adults
  • Repeated-measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Ups and downs of alcohol use among first-year college students : Number of drinks, heavy drinking, and stumble and pass out drinking days. / Maggs, Jennifer L.; Williams, Lela; Lee, Christine M.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 36, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 197-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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