Updating after rotational and translational body movements: coordinate structure of perspective space.

Clark Presson, D. R. Montello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

184 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As people move through an environment, they typically change both their heading and their location relative to the surrounds. During such changes, people update their changing orientations with respect to surrounding objects. People can also update after only imagining such typical movements, but not as quickly or accurately as after actual movement. In the present study, blindfolded subjects pointed to objects after real and imagined walks. The role of rotational and translational components of movement were contrasted. The difficulty of imagined updating was found to be due to imagined rotation and not to imagined translation; updating after the latter was just as quick and accurate as updating after actual rotations and translations. Implications for understanding primary spatial orientation, the organization of spatial knowledge, and spatial-imagination processes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1447-1455
Number of pages9
JournalPerception
Volume23
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1994

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Imagination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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Updating after rotational and translational body movements : coordinate structure of perspective space. / Presson, Clark; Montello, D. R.

In: Perception, Vol. 23, No. 12, 1994, p. 1447-1455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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